Next video:
Loading the player...

In statistics, mutually exclusive situations involve the occurrence of one event that does not influence or cause another event.

For example, two rolls of one die are mutually exclusive events because one roll’s result has no impact on the next roll.

Mutually exclusive events cannot occur simultaneously. For example, a car driver could not turn left and right at the same time. However, they could turn right and sing at the same time.

Knowing whether two events are mutually exclusive can help calculate the probability they will occur.

Related Articles
  1. Investing

    4 Mistakes to Avoid When Choosing Mutual Funds to Invest in

    Mutual funds are a great way to build wealth but not all of them are the same. Investors have to be mindful of fees, turnover, redundancy and performance.
  2. Financial Advisor

    A Mutual Funds Guide for Young Investors

    Learn how mutual funds work, why they are so popular and how younger investors can get started by putting mutual funds in their IRAs or 401(k)s.
  3. Financial Advisor

    An Introduction To Mutual Funds

    Mutual funds are the starting point for many individual investors because they offer a balanced portfolio in a single investment. Find out how mutual funds work and whether they are the investment ...
  4. Investing

    What You Need to Know About Mutual Funds

    Mutual funds are a good investment opportunity, but investors should know how they operate.
  5. Investing

    How Mutual Funds Affect Stock Prices

    Find out how mutual fund trading activity -- and that of other institutional investors -- impacts stock prices, including both short and long-term effects.
  6. Investing

    How liquid are Fidelity mutual funds?

    Review the liquidity features of mutual fund shares and an overview of Fidelity mutual funds. Most investors look for convenient access to their investments.
  7. Investing

    The Advantages Of Mutual Funds

    Diversification, or the mixing of investments within a portfolio to manage risk, is one of the many advantages to investing in mutual funds.
  8. Investing

    Are Mutual Funds A Relic?

    We list some options other than mutual funds for your retirement plan.
  9. Investing

    How to Choose Between Mutual Funds and ETFs

    Mutual funds and ETFs are both investment funds, but they are not as similar as you might think.
Hot Definitions
  1. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a company's ability to pay short-term and long-term obligations, also known ...
  2. SEC Form 13F

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the Information Required of Institutional Investment ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Risk Averse

    A description of an investor who, when faced with two investments with a similar expected return (but different risks), will ...
  5. Indirect Tax

    A tax that increases the price of a good so that consumers are actually paying the tax by paying more for the products. An ...
  6. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
Trading Center