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Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments. People who prefer to invest based on quantitative analysis are often referred to as “quants."

Analysts who perform quantitative analysis use various mathematical methods such a probability, game theory, statistics and calculus.  Whatever method is used, the goal is to develop a mathematical model that replicates real world behavior and results. 

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