Complete Guide To Investment Companies, Funds And REITs


Hedge Funds - Directional Or Tactical Strategies

The largest group of hedge funds uses directional or tactical strategies. One example is the macro fund, made famous by George Soros and his Quantum Fund, which dominated the hedge fund universe and newspaper headlines in the 1990s. Macro funds are global, making "top-down" bets on currencies, interest rates, commodities or foreign economies. Because they are for "big picture" investors, macro funds often do not analyze individual companies.

Here are some other examples of directional or tactical strategies:

  • Long/short strategies combine purchases (long positions) with short sales. For example, a long/short manager might purchase a portfolio of core stocks that occupy the S&P 500 and hedge by selling (shorting) S&P 500 Index futures. If the S&P 500 goes down, the short position will offset the losses in the core portfolio, limiting overall losses.

  • Market neutral strategies are a specific type of long/short with the goal to negate the impact and risk of general market movements, trying to isolate the pure returns of individual stocks. This type of strategy is a good example of how hedge funds can aim for positive, absolute returns even in a bear market. For example, a market neutral manager might purchase one hardware company and simultaneously short another, betting that the former will outperform the latter. The market could go down and both stocks could go down along with the market, but as long as the former outperforms the latter, the short sale on first company will produce a net profit for the position.

  • Dedicated short strategies specialize in the short sale of overvalued securities. Because losses on short-only positions are theoretically unlimited (because the stock can rise indefinitely), these strategies are particularly risky. Some of these dedicated short funds are among the first to foresee corporate collapses; the managers of these funds can be particularly skilled at scrutinizing company fundamentals and financial statements in search of red flags.
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How Mutual Fund Companies Make Money

    Read about the many different kinds of fees and sales charges mutual fund companies can use to generate revenue from those who invest in their shares.
  2. Investing Basics

    The Lipper Rating System Explained

    Take a closer look at how Lipper Inc., a subsidiary of Thomas Reuters, determines the ratings for mutual funds in its Lipper Rating System.
  3. Stock Analysis

    The 5 Best Alternatives to Zillow & Trulia

    Understand the online real estate industry and how Zillow and Trulia are industry leaders. Learn about alternatives to Zillow and Trulia.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Mutual Funds Are Not FDIC Insured: Here Is Why

    Find out why mutual funds are not insured by the FDIC, including why the FDIC was created and how to minimize your risk with educated mutual fund investments.
  5. Professionals

    How to Sell Mutual Funds to Your Clients

    Learn about the various talking points you should cover when discussing mutual funds with clients and how explaining their benefits can help you close the sale.
  6. Investing

    Have Commodities Bottomed?

    Commodity prices have been heading lower for more than four years, being the worst performing asset class of 2015 with more losses in cyclical commodities.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top Three Transportation ETFs

    These three transportation funds attract the majority of sector volume.
  8. Professionals

    Tax Efficient Strategies for Mutual Funds

    Before you sell mutual fund shares, consider these tax strategies first.
  9. Investing Basics

    Tops Tips for Trading ETFs

    A look at two different trading strategies for ETFs - one for investors and the other for active traders.
  10. Investing Basics

    Statistical Proof That Buy-and-Hold Investing Pays Off

    Learn about how the data suggests that the buy-and-hold investment strategy still works, even after the huge declines of the Great Recession.
  1. Private Equity Real Estate

    A Definition of "Private Equity Real Estate" and how it applies ...
  2. Alpha

    Alpha is used in finance to represent two things: 1. a measure ...
  3. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based ...
  4. Equity

    Equity is the value of an asset less the value of all liabilities ...
  5. Derivative

    A security with a price that is dependent upon or derived from ...
  6. Real Estate Investment Trust - ...

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through ...
  1. Can mutual funds invest in hedge funds?

    Mutual funds are legally allowed to invest in hedge funds. However, hedge funds and mutual funds have striking differences ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main kinds of annuities?

    There are two broad categories of annuity: fixed and variable. These categories refer to the manner in which the investment ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the risks of rolling my 401(k) into an annuity?

    Though the appeal of having guaranteed income after retirement is undeniable, there are actually a number of risks to consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I get out of my annuity and transfer to a new one?

    If you decide your current annuity is not for you, there is nothing stopping you from transferring your investment to a new ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the risks of annuities in a recession?

    Annuities come in several forms, the two most common being fixed annuities and variable annuities. During a recession, variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do financial advisors get paid by mutual funds?

    Financial advisors are reimbursed by mutual funds in exchange for the investment and financial advice they provide. A financial ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  2. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  3. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
  4. Cost Of Funds

    The interest rate paid by financial institutions for the funds that they deploy in their business. The cost of funds is one ...
  5. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  6. Capitalized Cost

    An expense that is added to the cost basis of a fixed asset on a company's balance sheet. Capitalized Costs are incurred ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!