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Heather Clark

Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing
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“Heather Clark is a Financial Advisor at Millennial Wealth Management, an independent, fee-only financial planning firm dedicated to serving the next generation of investors.”
Firm:

Millennial Wealth Management

Job Title:

Financial Advisor

Biography:

Heather Clark is a Financial Advisor at Millennial Wealth Management, LLC, a different kind of financial advisory firm dedicated to serving the needs of Millennials. Heather's and MWM's comprehensive financial planning service is unique in the investment industry, as it is a true partnership between the firm and their clients. No two client relationships look the same when working with them, because let's face it, nobody is in the same financial position with the same goals and life circumstances. Heather's promise to their clients is to always put their interests first, which they committed to when they took the fiduciary oath.

Millennial Wealth Management, LLC was created from the understanding that the vast majority of financial firms were really only looking out for one person... themselves. Think about it, should you trust the financial firms that nearly brought down the global economy a few years ago (the largest crash since the great depression) with your hard earned money? No?! Me neither!

Financial representatives make a sizable commission when they sell you a product, sometimes as high as 8%... Can they really put your best interests first? I don't think so, either. With that being said, Heather committed to working for a firm designed to eliminate any and all conflicts of interest with the sole focus on helping his clients achieve financial success through prudent financial planning and low-cost, tax-efficient investment options. Heather is proud to hold herself to a higher standard at MWM.

Fee Structure:

Fee-Only

CRD Number:

7006011

Disclaimer:

The information on this site is provided “AS IS” and without warranties of any kind either express or implied. To the fullest extent permissible pursuant to applicable laws, Millennial Wealth Management, LLC referred to as "MWM" disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, non-infringement and suitability for a particular purpose. MWM does not warrant that the information will be free from error. None of the information provided on this website is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement of any company, security, fund, or other securities or non-securities offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information is at your sole risk. Under no circumstances shall MWM be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages that result from the use of, or the inability to use, the materials in this site, even if MWM or a MWM authorized representative has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In no event shall Millennial Wealth Management, LLC have any liability to you for damages, losses and causes of action for accessing this site. Information on this website should not be considered a solicitation to buy, an offer to sell, or a recommendation of any security in any jurisdiction where such offer, solicitation, or recommendation would be unlawful or unauthorized. COPYRIGHT MILLENNIAL WEALTH MANAGEMENT, LLC 2016. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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    Banking, Debt, Retirement, Estate Planning, Real Estate
I’m 28, married, with combined pre-tax income of $240,000 annually, but with $350,000 in student loan debt; how can my wife and I retire by age 40?
100% of people found this answer helpful

When considering a financial plan for a client, I like to first focus on net worth and monthly cash flow. While you are doing a good job living below your income level and saving a significant portion per month, your net worth is still negative due to those student loans. Your first step is to look at the interest rates on your student loans and the return you may receive investing your money. If the interest rates on your loan are greater than 5% it may be worth aggressively trying to pay off the loan. Plus there’s the added bonus of the psychological relief you may feel knowing you have the debt paid off (plus imagine your monthly cash flows without that portion of your debt!)

Rental incomes are a good way to potentially create some steady income, but given your student loan debt and the portion of your income that you are saving per month, it will be a while before you can manage to purchase a home. One way to participate in our growing housing market is to invest in REITs. They are real estate investments that give you the opportunity to participate in the growth of the real estate market without taking on the additional work and liability that a house brings, in addition to being more affordable while you create your investment portfolio. In short, it is a good idea to start investing your additional income rather than keeping it in a savings account. Whether it’s paying off debt or growing in the market, it could be doing much more to serve you in the long term if it had a purpose.

One of the big things I talk about with my clients is the difference between retirement and financial independence. Millennials really are approaching what we have thought of as “retirement” completely differently than previous generations. This is something for you to put a little thought into. If your goal is to be “retired” by 40, what does your life look like after? Do you want to be managing rental properties? Do you want to be giving back to your community? There’s a difference between retirement and financial independence. Retirement implies you’re no longer working and contributing to your community in the same way that you once were. Financial independence means you are set up well enough that you could quit your job if you wanted to and go write that book, travel, etc. I like to talk with my clients about what their bigger goals are and how we can get them to a finial position to be able to achieve them, whether they involve working, traveling, being home with the family, etc. Having a clearer idea of what your plans are for the second half of your life will greatly help you navigate which forms of passive income you want to invest in.

November 2018
    401(k), Real Estate
Am I in a good financial situation?
100% of people found this answer helpful
January 2019
    Investing, ETFs, Stocks
Is it better to invest in stocks individually or in an ETF which covers all the stocks in which I want to invest?
100% of people found this answer helpful
November 2018
    Debt, Personal Finance
Should I postpone attending college to pay off my current debt, or go further into debt to pay for school?
100% of people found this answer helpful
November 2018
    Personal Finance, International / Global
What credit cards are recommended for a college student to study abroad?
100% of people found this answer helpful
November 2018