Carolyn Howard

CFP®
Retirement, Investing, Lifestage Based Planning
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“At SeaCure Advisors we help our clients meet their goals through comprehensive lifestage planning for their mature needs. We are independent registered investment advisors that are fee-based and do not require asset management to actively engage with our clients. We coordinate a team for our clients so all of their issues and concerns are addressed.”
Firm:

SeaCure Advisors LLC

Job Title:

Founder, Managing member, and Chief Compliance Officer

Biography:

Carolyn graduated with a BS in Chemistry from the University of Kentucky in 1968, and with a MEd in Science Education from Boston University in 1971. She applied her education by teaching in public and private secondary schools for 17 years. In 1993, recognizing the need to resolve her own financial issues, Carolyn began studying all aspects of wealth management. Feeling that she had found her calling, she took her passion for teaching to the financial services industry.

Carolyn began her career in financial services with Equitable/AXA Financial. Initially, she utilized her education background to specialize as a retirement planning consultant for teachers and non-profit organizations. Prior to founding Pegaesus Advisors, Inc., and SeaCure Advisors, LLC, Carolyn co-founded another registered investment advisory firm that she sold in 2001.

In 2001, numerous circumstances made it difficult for Carolyn's clients to make financial decisions. It was then that she began collaborating with a highly recognized wealth counselor. For her work, Carolyn was featured in the Boston Globe and was quoted in the Wall Street Journal. She has also become a sought after speaker for financial planning workshops and seminars.

Carolyn has volunteered in various community service organizations over the years. She has taught retirement planning at Technical Development Corporation, a management institute serving non-profits in Boston and New England. She has been a continuing education instructor for CPAs, attorneys, and CFPs in Massachusetts. Carolyn has had memberships in the Institute of Estate Planners, American Association of Individual Investors, National Association of Investment Clubs, International Association of Registered Financial Consultants, Inc., and the MIT Women's League Financial Group.

Carolyn is currently a member in the Institute of Certified Financial Planners, the Financial Planning Association, University of KY's foundation - Women and Philanthropy, and the National Association of Professional Women. Carolyn continues to provide Pro-Bono financial planning services for individuals and families at Dana Farber Cancer Center in Boston, MA. She believes she has a true calling for this work since her late husband, Jack Howard, died in 2008 from brain cancer. One of Carolyn's hobbies is sewing where she works with the Dorcas Society in Sarasota, FL, making clothes for young underpriviledged girls. Carolyn also volunteers for the Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation committee for their annual antique and garden show.

Carolyn enjoys music, art, historic preservation and restoration, gardening, and swimming. She resides with her husband, Albert Kelley. She is the mother of two adult children, Courtenay and Jonathan. She is also "Mimi" to two beautiful granddaughters.

Education:

BS, Chemistry, University of Kentucky
MEd, Science Education, Boston University

Assets Under Management:

$12 million

Fee Structure:

Fee-Based

CRD Number:

2391466

Insurance License:

#Yes

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April 2018

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    Real Estate, Taxes
How will I be taxed on the money from the sale of my house?
100% of people found this answer helpful

If the house you are selling has been your primary residence two out of the last five years, you will have $250,000 capital gains tax free if you are single and $500,000 capital gains tax free if you are married.

In determining how to calculate your capital gain exposure, you will take what you paid for the house, add the cost of any improvements to determine your cost basis.  So for example, if you paid $200,000 for your home and you improved it with new windows, new bathroom(s), kitchen or any other qualified improvements that cost $100,000 over the time you have resided in your home, your cost base would be $300,000.  Let's say you sold your home for $450,000.  That price would be $150,000 of capital gains.  That number is less than the allowed amount of $250,000 as a single person or $500,000 as a married person, so you would owe no taxes.  If it sold for $600,000, the capital gains would be $300,000.  You would have $300,000 minus $250,000 (as a single person) = $50,000 for your capital gains exposure.  If you were married, again the $300,000 gain is less than the $500,000 so there would be no capital gains exposure. If you have resided in the home less than two out of the five years, any gain over the cost basis is exposed to capital gains.  You may consider consulting your accountant to determine the exact gain exposure if any.

August 2018
    Asset Allocation, Bonds / Fixed Income, Choosing an Advisor
Should I try a do-it-yourself approach when beginning to invest 50% in stocks and 50% in bond mutual funds, or hire a financial advisor to select a basket of stock options and bond mutual funds? 
100% of people found this answer helpful
March 2018
    Estate Planning, Investing, IRAs, Real Estate, Taxes
To pay my inheritance tax, should I use money from the sale of my house or withdraw from my investment account?
100% of people found this answer helpful
April 2018
    Financial Planning, Retirement, Pensions, IRAs, Taxes
Can I take distributions from a defined benefit pension from a former employer while making tax deferred contributions to a 457 plan at my current employer?
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last month
    Military / Veterans, Investing, Starting Out
What are the best investment vehicles for a young, new investor looking for simple, long-term investments?
88% of people found this answer helpful
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