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Jillian Nel

CFP®, CDFA™
Personal Finance, Retirement, Insurance
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“Jillian Nel, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, directs a financial planning practice for Legacy Asset Management, Inc. Jillian is committed to educating and empowering clients and the general public about the importance of financial planning.”
Firm:

Legacy Asset Management

Job Title:

Principal & Director of Financial Planning

Biography:
Education:

BS, Business Administration, University of Colorado at Boulder

Assets Under Management:

$340 million

Fee Structure:

Asset-Based

CRD Number:

5055280

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December 2017
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December 2017

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    Banking, Debt, Financial Planning, Retirement, 401(k)
When selecting funds to invest my HSA dollars, should I be looking for funds that pay a quarterly/annual dividend, or should I invest my dollars in a growth fund to take advantage of the decades of work I have left until retirement?
100% of people found this answer helpful

My general advice only knowing your age and your expressed (and awesome) money habits is to grow the heck out of your HSA funds.  As far as waiting until the market dips to invest, its impossible to time the market.  You could be waiting a year or two - and will have missed some upside potential.  Also, as you stated, there are decades of years for growth and deposits so you have time on your side to recover when the market does correct.  A better option than trying to time the market is investing in your HSA at regular intervals - monthly or quarterly to take advantage of different market cycles.  Do always keep in low volatility (cash or something with a bit of interest) enough to cover your deductibles and total out of pocket.  Dollar cost average the rest, i.e. invest at regular intervals.  

One other note, your current financial situation is a reflection of really good money habits! The only item that seems to be missing is an adequate emergency fund which is 3-6 months of essential expenses.  Since you are saving for a home and currently have your savings in your HSA already, you likely already have enough funds to cover emergencies.  My point in suggesting that you also establish an emergency fund in addition to your HSA and savings for a home is eventually that home savings will be used to buy a house. If you dont have other cash, you could need to dip into your HSA for expenses other than those that are health related.  

Hope that helps!

May 2019
    Pensions, Bonds / Fixed Income, Real Estate, Stocks, Taxes
Should we rent or sell my mother's home now that she has vacated it?
100% of people found this answer helpful
last month
    Retirement, IRAs, Retirement Plans, Women & Money
Should I convert my two 403(b) accounts into a Roth IRA?
100% of people found this answer helpful
August 2018
    Insurance
Are there disadvantages to having both a flexible spending account (FSA) and a health savings account (HSA)?
100% of people found this answer helpful
May 2018
    Retirement, Social Security
Are Social Security benefits withheld because of excess earnings returned to you in monthly installments when you reach full retirement age? 
100% of people found this answer helpful
June 2018