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David N. Waldrop

CFP®, CLU
Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing
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“David N. Waldrop, Certified Financial Planner®, is committed to accuracy and availability, timely completion, and customizes the scope of planning for each client.”
Firm:

Bridgeview Capital Advisors, Inc.

Job Title:

President

Biography:

David N. Waldrop has earned the trust and respect of his clients during his career in the financial services industry. His wealth of knowledge allows him to provide the superb personal service and financial perspective upon which our customers have come to rely. He works closely with clients and has a proven ability to respond and plan for their needs.

As a Certified Financial Planner and President of Bridgeview Capital Advisors, Inc., David is responsible for advising clients in the areas of retirement plans and portfolio management. Specializing in financial planning and consulting, David brings together all aspects of his clients’ finances while incorporating their goals and objectives, both personal and financial.

After graduating from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in 1998, David joined the lending division of a well known national bank where he specialized in consumer credit analysis and finance. In 2000, David steered his focus toward investments and insurance planning. In addition to providing auto, home, and life insurance, David worked directly with clients and public institutions to establish and promote retirement savings through various qualified plans.

After completing the professional and educational requirements of the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, David earned the marks of a Certified Financial Planner or CFP®. In this capacity, David focused on high net worth clients and prepared asset allocation analysis, cash flow planning, and insurance strategies. As a Financial Advisor with Bridgeview Capital Advisors, Inc., David provides his services to a broader clientele and customizes the scope of planning for each client.

In his time away from work, David enjoys spending time with his family, golfing and playing guitar. He is also a proud supporter of Shriners Hospitals for Children in Sacramento.

Education:

BA, Political Science, California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

Assets Under Management:

$35 million

CRD Number:

4214855

All Articles
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April 2018
December 2017
    Investing, IRAs, Retirement, Retirement Plans, Retirement Savings
March 2017
    401(k), IRAs, Retirement Savings, Income Tax
March 2017
    IRAs, Retirement Savings
March 2017
    401(k), IRAs, Retirement Plans, Retirement Savings

All Answers
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    Personal Finance
What happens if interest rates increase too quickly?
100% of people found this answer helpful

Steadily increasing interest rates shouldn’t be a problem. We’re coming off of record low interest rates for a record period of time. Normalizing interest rates should be viewed as a positive development. However, interest rates that rise too quickly could be problematic.

If mortgage rates rise too quickly, it could price people out of making a home purchase. Real estate is a huge economic driver for the economy and if rates rise too quickly, it could cause a slowdown.

Small business relies heavily on access to credit to fund new investment, hiring, and payroll. Most businesses make reasonable plans to plan for future costs. If the costs (interest rates) rise too quickly, that could hurt small business.

Bonds also react negatively if rates rise too fast. Bond prices move opposite of interest rates. As rates rise, bond values decline. If they rise slowly, it isn’t much of an issue, if they rise quickly, that’s another story. I write about interest rate risk in an article called Bond Fund Basics and it goes into a bit more detail. I hope you find it helpful.

Please note that this should not be considered investment advice and is only educational in nature.

Best of luck!

David N. Waldrop, CFP®

February 2017
    401(k), IRAs
What are the differences between a 401K and an IRA?
100% of people found this answer helpful
March 2017
    IRAs
How can you borrow from a Roth IRA?
65% of people found this answer helpful
February 2017
    Investing, Stocks
What is the direct correlation between the stock market highs and Trump's presidency?
52% of people found this answer helpful
March 2017
    Investing, Lifestage Based Planning
What is the best route to invest $50,000?
50% of people found this answer helpful
January 2017