Sam Benen

Personal Finance, Retirement, Investing
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“With a decade of experience in the financial world, Sam Benen is committed to being a helpful resource for a wide range of personal financial decisions.”
Firm:

SJBenen Advisory, LLC

Job Title:

Investment Adviser

Biography:

Sam Benen is an Investment Advisor at SJBenen Advisory, LLC, a Registered Investment Adviser firm, established in 2016, located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Sam and his team are committed to upholding the highest standards of ethical conduct and acting as a fiduciary to serve the best interests of his clients above all else.

Sam has been in the investing business since graduating from Princeton in 2007 with a Bachelor’s degree in economics.  He got his start in financial markets right out of college working as a trading assistant at Susquehanna International Group, participating in arbitrage strategies in options and ETFs. Sam worked for nearly 4 years as a trader at a hedge fund in Greenwich, Connecticut called Paloma Partners, where he worked for one of their internal groups called Xaraf Management.  At Xaraf, Sam and his team traded in a wide range of derivatives markets, ranging from bonds to stocks to currencies. He worked for nearly 5 years as a portfolio manager at Talpion, a family office in New York City. His focus there was trying to generate absolute return in all market environments, meaning he tried to make returns whether the market was up or down by finding niche pockets of financial markets where he had an edge. 

Sam was a top-ranked chess player in the nation, winning 7 individual national chess championships between the ages of 8 and 18.  He is an ever-aspiring dilettante at all kinds of strategic games like Scrabble, Boggle, gin rummy, poker, and his favorite of them all, golf.  Sam is originally from New York City and now lives with his wife in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Education:

BA, Economics, Princeton University

Assets Under Management:

$42 million

CRD Number:

6634000

Disclaimer:

SJBENEN ADVISORY, LLC IS A REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISER. INFORMATION PRESENTED IS FOR EDUCATONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT INTEND TO MAKE AN OFFER OR SOLICITATION FOR THE SALE OR PURCHASE OF ANY SPECIFIC SECURITIES, INVESTMENTS, OR INVESTMENT STRATEGIES. INVESTMENTS INVOLVE RISK AND UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED, ARE NOT GUARANTEED. BE SURE TO FIRST CONSULT WITH A QUALIFIED FINANCIAL ADVISER AND/OR TAX PROFESSIONAL BEFORE IMPLEMENTING ANY STRATEGY DISCUSSED HEREIN

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  • Sam Benen -- SJBenen Advisory, LLC
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May 2017

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    Investing, ETFs
How do I differentiate and determine which ETF is right for me?
79% of people found this answer helpful

Here's a quick guide to ETFs for beginners looking to manage their own money: Look at broad-based index ETFs with a total expense ratio under 0.15%. You can browse around on the websites of Vanguard and iShares for index ETFs with extremely low fees and many holdings. On the information page for each ETF, they will show you the number of holdings (you want very high) and the expense ratio (you want very low).

Do not use leveraged ETFs or anything fancy like that. Those are for speculators and not for long-term investors. Think ETFs with names like "Total US Market," "All-world ex-US," and "Aggregate bond."

Also, look for brokerage arrangements where you can trade ETFs without commissions. For example, in a Vanguard account, you can trade Vanguard ETFs without commissions, and in a Fidelity account, you can trade iShares ETFs without commissions. Paying zero commissions and micro fees (under 0.15%) will help you get to your beach house faster, while paying high commissions and high fees will only help pay for the broker's beach house! In all seriousness, fees are an important component of total return for long-term investing, so make sure to keep them low!

If you do not want to manage your own money or need further help, consult with an advisor or financial planner to discuss personal goals and asset allocation strategies.

February 2017
    Debt, Investing
Should I begin to invest despite being in debt?
77% of people found this answer helpful
May 2017
    Debt, Financial Planning, Retirement, Investing
Should I use my saved money to pay off my mortgage or invest?
75% of people found this answer helpful
5 weeks ago
    Real Estate
Is it a sound financial decision to buy a house that you will only live in for four to five years?
71% of people found this answer helpful
February 2018
    Banking, Bonds / Fixed Income
In the movie The Big Short, how does Dr. Burry buy credit default swaps?
71% of people found this answer helpful
September 2017