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Mark Painter

CFA
Retirement, Investing, Small Business
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“Mark Painter, CFA, founder and President of EverGuide Financial Group, focuses his time on helping clients save and grow their money by reducing taxes and building portfolios that reach individual client objectives.”
Firm:

EverGuide Financial Group, LLC

Job Title:

President

Biography:

Mark R. Painter, CFA is the Founder and President of EverGuide Financial group. He has been an investment manager for over 12 years at both the institutional and retail level having managed public mutual funds and individual client accounts. Additionally he has written for Seeking Alpha and been a speaker on various panels and industry conferences. Mark and his team's mission at EverGuide Financial Group is to help their clients navigate their financial course through cost effective wealth management and Everlasting education.

A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University Tepper School of Business, Mark went on to attain his CFA charter in 2009. Mark worked for Stanley Laman Group, Ltd from 2004 2016.

At Stanley Laman Group, Mark quickly went from analyst to portfolio manager in 2005 and helped create their portfolio management business.  Not only was Mark responsible for portfolio management but also had large responsibilities in working with clients to understand their needs and financial goals. In 2014 Mark became the lead portfolio manager of a publicly listed mutual fund (American Real Estate Income Fund).

Education:

BS, Business Administration, Carnegie Mellon University

Assets Under Management:

$30 million

Fee Structure:

Asset-Based

CRD Number:

4877921

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October 2018
    Taxes, Investing

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    Pensions, Bonds / Fixed Income, Real Estate, Stocks, Taxes
Should we rent or sell my mother's home now that she has vacated it?
100% of people found this answer helpful

From a pure investment perspective the quick answer is sell the property.  Assuming the 3,000 a month is a gross number and does not include taxes, insurance, miscellaneous expenses then you can divide the yearly income 36,000 by the market value 1,250,000 to get a  return of 2.88%.  This is a very low rate of return.  Now, let's also assume that you have a 0 cost basis in the house and after all taxes, closing costs, fees are paid you net 1,000,000 for the property.  Dividing 36,000 from 1,000,000 still only nets a return of 3.6% which is still fairly low.  I usually recommend to clients to get a 6% return at a bare minimum for real estate investments in order to justify the illiquidity and hassle of owning real estate.  In many cases, returns are significantly higher for real estate than 6%.  

Let's take this one step further and take the 1,000,000 net cash from the sale of the property plus the 600,000 in stocks and bonds.  If you divide the 80,000 by 1,600,000 you get a required return of 5%. This does not even factor the social security and the small pension which would reduce the required return.   A 5% income return can be achieved in the current environment with a well diversified portfolio that will allow you and your mother to live comfortable for a long period of time.  

I willl end by saying that there are ways that you may be able to reduce the tax burden but it is well beyond the scope of this post and would require a lot more information about the personal situation.  I would recommend at least having a consultation with a financial advisor or accountant to see if they can help.   

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    Retirement, 401(k), Asset Allocation, Bonds / Fixed Income, Choosing an Advisor
What is the optimum number of stocks and bonds to have in a portfolio?
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May 2019
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Should I switch future contributions from an existing traditional 401(k) to a Roth 401(k) even if it bumps me to the 24 percent tax bracket?
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March 2019
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How can my wife and I reduce income tax when we start to withdraw from our IRA accounts during retirement years?
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March 2019