Matt Ahrens

CIMA®
Retirement, Investing, Small Business
97%
Helpful
94
Answers
3
Articles
12
Followers
“Matt Ahrens, CIMA® works primarily with physicians, small business owners, and young entrepreneurs and has been quoted in such publications as the Wall Street Journal, US News & World Report among others on investment and retirement strategies.”
Firm:

Integrity Advisory, LLC

Job Title:

Financial Advisor

Biography:

As a Financial Advisor at Integrity Advisory, LLC Matt Ahrens is focused on helping business professionals simplify their financial lives and find financial security as they face life's everyday challenges.

Since joining the firm in 2015 as a financial advisor, Matt has overseen the investment management and portfolio construction process for our clients. During this time, he earned the Certified Investment Management Analyst® designation which included an extensive class on portfolio design at the prestigious Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Matt specializes in assisting physicians, small business owners, and young entrepreneurs who often find themselves with little time to manage their own investments.

Matt and his team help their clients track all of their investments in one centralized location and use the information to make sure they can retire when they want to and how they want to.

Education:

BS, Accounting, Washburn University

Assets Under Management:

$135 million

Fee Structure:

Asset-Based

CRD Number:

5308493

All Articles
Sort By:
Most Helpful
June 2018
    College Tuition, Tax Deductions / Credits
April 2018
    Investing, Alternative Investments
February 2018
    College Tuition, Financial Planning, Retirement Savings

All Answers
Sort By:
Most Helpful
    Financial Planning, Retirement, Pensions, Social Security, 401(k)
Is it better for my wife to draw her Social Security benefits before I do to help supplement our income, or wait until my full retirement age and then she can file for her 50 percent to receive a larger payment?
75% of people found this answer helpful

Great question, and something we discuss in retirement planning all the time.  Since your Social Security benefit appears to be significantly greater than your wife's then I would suggest you wait until at least your full retirement age.  It is likely (although slightly uncertain because I don't know all of your circumstances, family life expectancy, etc) that your wife should go ahead and file at her full retirement age.  I know her benefit is smaller, but most she can get is 50% of your benefit and she receives that if she delays until full retirement age.  Then she can take her benefit until you file.  Once you file then Social Security will automatically give her the greater of her benefit or her spousal benefit.

If at all possible it would be great if you could continue to draw down your investments and delay Social Security until age 70.  You may not be able to make it work, but every month that you delay your benefit increases your payout.  If something happened to you then your wife might lose your pension income, but she would get the greater of her Social Security or yours (which clearly it's yours).  It's tough to beat the guaranteed 8% increase that Social Security gives you until age 70, but I understand your budget situation may not allow for that. 

Hopefully that was helpful.  I'd be happy to run a free Social Security analysis for you.  Just let me know.

Good luck to you,

Matt Ahrens, CIMA®

last month
    Asset Allocation, ETFs, Stocks
With so many sector and sub-sector ETFs, is it wise to take individual stock risk in my account?
100% of people found this answer helpful
July 2018
    Bonds / Fixed Income, ETFs, Stocks, Starting Out
What are the best market conditions for buying a total bond ETF?
July 2018
    Debt, Investing, IRAs, Real Estate, Taxes
When does it make sense to invest in an individual taxable account rather than maxing out tax-advantaged accounts?
71% of people found this answer helpful
July 2018
    Debt, Investing, Mutual Funds, Stocks, Women & Money
Should we invest in stocks or pay off student loans with money gifted to us from our wedding?
67% of people found this answer helpful
July 2018