Matt Ahrens

CIMA®
Retirement, Investing, Small Business
97%
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“Matt Ahrens, CIMA® works primarily with physicians, small business owners, and young entrepreneurs and has been quoted in such publications as the Wall Street Journal, US News & World Report among others on investment and retirement strategies.”
Firm:

Integrity Advisory, LLC

Job Title:

Financial Advisor

Biography:

As a Financial Advisor at Integrity Advisory, LLC Matt Ahrens is focused on helping business professionals simplify their financial lives and find financial security as they face life's everyday challenges.

Since joining the firm in 2015 as a financial advisor, Matt has overseen the investment management and portfolio construction process for our clients. During this time, he earned the Certified Investment Management Analyst® designation which included an extensive class on portfolio design at the prestigious Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Matt specializes in assisting physicians, small business owners, and young entrepreneurs who often find themselves with little time to manage their own investments.

Matt and his team help their clients track all of their investments in one centralized location and use the information to make sure they can retire when they want to and how they want to.

Education:

BS, Accounting, Washburn University

Assets Under Management:

$135 million

Fee Structure:

Asset-Based

CRD Number:

5308493

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4 weeks ago
    College Tuition, Tax Deductions / Credits
last month
    Investing, Alternative Investments
February 2018
    College Tuition, Financial Planning, Retirement Savings

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    Banking, Financial Planning, Retirement, Investing, Mutual Funds
What is the best way to save for the future outside of a work retirement plan?
50% of people found this answer helpful

That's a good question and it's great that you're taking your retirement seriously now.  As you know the thrift savings plan works very similar to a 401(k) which it sounds like you will also have access to at your company.  A couple of thoughts here for you.

1) You are certainly allowed to contribute to both the thrift savings plan and the 401(k), but you're limited to $18,500 in your personal contributions.  That includes both accounts combined.  If your company offers a match then certainly contribute enough to get the full match, but after that consider where to put the remaining contribution.  If you work for a large company of more than 100 employees then the cost is probably fairly reasonable.  If it's a small company then check out your fund expenses and compare them to the expenses in your thrift savings plan.  If it's a small company and the employer isn't picking up the tab then there may be high fees and you'd be better off contributing more to the thrift savings plan.

2) By contributing to these plans then you are already taking advantage of dollar cost averaging, and I would certainly consider index funds given your age.  Right now risk is your friend, and if the market drops it's to your advantage.  A market drop would allow you to buy more shares at a cheaper price and that's all good news for you.

I utilize an online savings account for my 6 - 9 month emergency account.  I keep a small amount at a regular bank savings account so it's accessible, but the rest is online getting around 1.5% annually.  That's a great idea and I'd encourage you to do that.

If you want to invest excess cash, but don't want to lock it up until you're 59 1/2 then consider opening a Roth IRA.  Someone previously mentioned a taxable account, but that should be the last bucket you fill.  Contributions can be withdrawn in a Roth IRA at any time so it's important you track them.  If you withdraw earnings then you get hit with a 10% early distribution, but you can always access your own contributions.  Again I'd consider index funds or ETFs.  If you're going to dollar cost average in then make sure the ETFs don't have transaction fees.  Many custodians offer a wide list of transaction free ETFs.

Good luck to you and please let me know if I can be of help,

Matt Ahrens, CIMA®

3 weeks ago
    Investing
What are the pros and cons of a dividend reinvestment plan (DRIP)?
50% of people found this answer helpful
3 weeks ago
    Retirement, Investing, IRAs, Taxes
What strategy should I employ for taking funds from my 457(b) retirement account?
100% of people found this answer helpful
3 weeks ago
    Banking, Career / Compensation, Debt, 401(k), IRAs
How should I structure my savings in my lower 20s?
100% of people found this answer helpful
3 weeks ago
    Choosing an Advisor
Is my potential financial advisor charging reasonable fees?
100% of people found this answer helpful
3 weeks ago