What's up with celebrities trying to execute major business transactions over Twitter (TWTR)? Whatever happened to having your lawyer draw up a contract, like sensible human beings?

Last week, when pharmaceutical price-gouger Martin Shkreli plaintively tweeted a $10 million offer to Kanye West--for rights to the latter's latest album, "The Life of Pablo"--Kanye did not reply. Many probably assumed Kanye's silence was indicative of dignity. That Kanye was just too cool for school, too cool for an alleged securities fraudster, and too cool to try to make deals over social media.

But now, sadly, evidence has surfaced that suggests that Kanye was in fact too cool for none of those things. He was ignoring his Twitter stalker not because he was above it all, but because he was too busy Twitter-stalking Facebook Inc (FB) founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Interesting way to go after VC funding. But Tweeting messages into the ether isn't helpful. Especially if they are aimed at someone whose company is in direct competition with Twitter. Zuckerberg does have a Twitter handle, which Kanye didn't even bother to use (@finkd), but Zuck has Tweeted exactly 19 times since 2009. Twitter user @chrismessina feels obligated to point out the obvious.

Kanye offered Zuckerberg a completely arbitrary deadline:

Btw, Zuck's birthday is in May, which Kanye would have known by checking out his Facebook page.

The most important question arising from all this is: What are these "Kanye West ideas" that are worth $1 billion?

On this matter, Kanye's musings start to develop a gnomic, Jayden Smith-esque quality.

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