Since they first took off more than 30 years ago, frequent flyer programs have undergone as many changes as the airline industry itself. While it’s still possible to reap some major rewards – or to waste time collecting points you’ll never use – today’s programs look very different from those of even a few years ago. 

A huge shift, notes Brian Kelly, who calls himself “The Points Guy” and runs the website ThePointsGuy.com, has been in the way many airlines now calculate their rewards. Often called a “revenue-based model,” it rewards travelers for the amount of money they spend rather than the miles they fly. In other words, frequent flyer programs are becoming serious spender programs.

That can be a good thing or a bad one depending on the type of traveler you are. If you typically fly in economy class, you’re likely to benefit less than before. On the other hand, Kelly says, “just a couple of trips a year in a premium class of service” could mean many thousands of miles added to your account.

Though there may be more changes on the horizon, here are some of today’s best ways to earn airline miles.

Best Ways to Earn Miles

1. Focus on where you fly.

Most frequent flyer programs are free to join, so there’s no harm in signing up for a flock of them. However, you’re most likely to earn enough points to actually get something in return if you concentrate on just a couple of airlines that ply the routes you expect to fly. It’s better to have 100,000 points with one carrier than 10,000 each with 10. Note, too, that points may expire if your account is inactive for a certain period (typically 18 months), so you’ll need to monitor any account you open or risk losing your miles – another reason to keep the number manageable. 

2. Consider their partners.

Many airlines belong to networks of domestic and foreign carriers, such as Oneworld, SkyTeam and Star Alliance. These organizations, which you become part of by signing up for a member airline’s frequent flyer program, allow you to earn, combine and redeem miles on any partner airline. Again, which of these you might want to become part of will depend on the airlines you primarily fly. Their partners are listed on their sites.

3. Bag a bonus.

To entice you to sign up for the cards they co-brand with airlines, credit card issuers frequently offer bonus miles, sometimes enough for a reward all by themselves. Of course, that’s in the big print on their promotions. In the smaller print you’ll find the terms, such as that you have to spend a certain amount of money with the card within a few months’ time.

Alina Comoreanu, a research analyst with the finance website WalletHub.com, says that such cards can be attractive if you are planning a big trip in the near future and expect to be spending that much money anyway. Bear in mind, though, that they often have hefty interest rates – 16.5% or higher is common – so, unless you pay your bill off each month, you need to weigh the value of your bonus against the interest charges. 

4. Choose the right credit card.

Using a rewards credit card for all of your purchases (and paying it off each month) can be another way to rack up enough miles for a reward. There are two basic types of cards to consider: the co-branded cards affiliated with a particular airline and more general rewards cards that offer an assortment of awards, including airline miles. “The main difference between the cards would be that the airline-affiliated cards are more rewarding when used with said airline, while the generic one offers a larger spectrum of redeeming options,” Comoreanu says.

For example, the more general rewards cards typically allow you to use your miles on a variety of airlines, rather than just one. If you know you’re unlikely to use your miles for travel, you can redeem them for other things, including cash. “Straight up cash back is always more reliable,” Comoreanu says. “Points can devalue easily and customers may find themselves receiving less than when they first applied for the card.” For more, see Credit Card Rewards: Cash Back vs. Airline Miles.

5. Dine out.

Another good way to pile up points, and to keep them from expiring, is to link your credit card to a frequent flyer plan’s dining program, Kelly notes. When you charge a meal on that card at a participating restaurant, you’ll earn points based on the size of the tab.

6. Use shopping portals.

Many airlines also have shopping portals on their frequent-flyer websites. By going to that page first and clicking through to a participating merchant, you can earn points on your purchases. 

7. Fly.

Yes, you can still earn miles by flying – a fact easily overlooked among all the other ways to earn them. Because of the move to revenue-based programs, a costly ticket may get you more miles than a cheap one, even if the latter’s route covers a greater distance. That, of course, is rarely a good reason to spring for a crazy high fare, especially if you’re the one paying the bill. The value of miles varies from airline to airline, but figure they’re worth about a penny apiece on average. That makes it pretty easy to compare fares and do the math. 

The Bottom Line

Frequent flyer programs are changing to reward high rollers, but there are still ways to earn miles without overpaying for them.

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