Some companies offer their employees the option of postponing part of their pay until after they retire through what is called a non-qualified deferred compensation (NQDC) plan. The plan may be offered in addition to, or in place of, a qualified retirement such as a 401(k) plan.

The plans are typically offered as a type of bonus to upper-level executives, who may max out their allowable contributions to the company's qualified retirement plan. In an NQDC plan, both the compensation and the taxes owed on it are delayed until a later date.

Key Takeaways

  • An NQDC plan delays payment of a portion of salary, and the taxes due on it, to a later date, typically after retirement.
  • Such plans generally are offered to senior executives as an added incentive.
  • Unlike income taxes, FICA taxes are due in the year the money is earned.

They are sometimes called 409(a) plans after the section of the U.S. Tax Code that regulates it.

If you are considering such an option, you should understand how you’ll be taxed on that money and any profits it earns over the years ahead. 

How NQDC Plans Are Taxed

Any salary, bonuses, commissions, and other compensation you agree to defer under an NQDC plan is not taxed in the year in which you earn it. (The deferral amount may be recorded on the Form W-2 you receive each year, as Code Y in box 12.)

Beware of early withdrawals. The penalties are severe.

You will be taxed on the compensation when you actually receive it. This should be sometime after you retire, unless you meet the rules for another triggering event that is allowed under the plan, such as a disability. The payment of the deferred compensation will reported on a Form W-2 even if you are no longer an employee at the time. 

You are also taxed on the earnings you get on your deferrals when they are paid to you. The rate of return is fixed by the terms of the plan. It may, for example, match the rate of return on the Standard & Poors 500 Index. 

When the Compensation Is in Stock or Options

When the compensation is payable in stock and stock options, special tax rules come into play. In such cases, the taxes will not be owed until the stock shares or options are yours to sell or give away as you choose.

However, you may want to report this compensation immediately. The IRS calls this a Section 83(b) election. It allows the recipient to report the value of the property as income now, with all future appreciation growing into capital gains that could be taxed at a favorable tax rate.

If you don't make the Section 83(b) election, you will owe taxes on the property and its appreciation at the time it is received.

The IRS has a sample 83(b) form that can be used to report this compensation currently rather than deferring it.

Tax Penalties for Early Distributions

There are heavy tax consequences if you withdraw money from an NQDC plan before you retire or when no other acceptable "trigger event" has occurred.

  • You are taxed immediately on all of the deferrals made under the plan, even if you have only receive a portion of it.
  • You are taxed on interest at a rate that is one percentage point higher than the penalty on underpayments. As of Dec. 2019, the rate of underpayments was 5%, so the taxable interest rate would be 6%.
  • You are subject to a 20% penalty on the deferrals. 

How It Effects FICA Taxes

The Social Security and Medicare tax (FICA on your W-2) is paid on compensation when it is earned, even if you opt to defer it.

This can be a good thing because of the Social Security wage cap. Take this example: Say in 2019 your compensation was $150,000 and you made a timely election to defer another $25,000. For the 2019 tax year, earnings subject to the Social Security portion of FICA were capped at $132,900. Thus, $42,100 of total compensation for the year is not subject to the FICA tax.

When the deferred compensation is paid out, say in retirement, no FICA tax will be deducted.

Is It Worth It?

A non-qualified deferred compensation plan, if one is available to you, can be a considerable benefit over the long run. You're investing money for your future while delaying taxes owed on earnings. That should get you a greater accrual of earnings.

However, the day of reckoning will come when you start to collect your deferred compensation. Just be prepared for the impact when it hits.