What Your Life Insurance Agent Makes on You

If you've ever talked to a life insurance agent, there's a good chance you were told that taking out a bigger policy—or investing in an annuity—was the key to financial peace of mind. It could be, but before you bite, be aware that the agent has incentives for selling you certain types of policies.

Key Takeaways

  • Many life insurance agents receive sales commissions for the products or services they sell to clients.
  • Agents will receive a large upfront commission based on the cost of the first year's policy premium, which can be a substantial percentage of that cost.
  • They will also receive ongoing or residual commissions each year the policy is in force, which tends to be far smaller but can add up over time.
  • Annuities also pay handsome commissions based on the upfront value of the annuity contract.

Most professionals who sell insurance are paid largely on a commission basis. In fact, most agents aren't even employees of the carrier. More often than not, they're independent contractors who are compensated based on how much they sell, with higher commissions for certain types of products.

This doesn't necessarily mean they're giving advice that doesn't fit your financial needs. Regulations require agents to offer policies that meet certain "suitability" standards. In other words, a consumer who finds out later that the coverage was inappropriate for their financial situation can file a complaint.

Significant Motivation to Sell

Agents are motivated to sell as much as they reasonably can. Whenever agents or brokers sell a life insurance policy, they typically take more than half of the first year’s premium. That can amount to hundreds or even thousands of dollars, depending on the size of the policy. They often also receive so-called "renewal" commissions, which can amount to as much as 7.5% of premiums for the next nine years that you keep the policy. Beyond that, some policies give the agent a small "persistency" fee annually, also known as a residual.

Renewal Commissions

Some insurance carriers are beginning to do away with renewal commissions on term life insurance policies, the most basic type of life insurance product. That's one reason why sales reps may try to push a whole life policy, which combines life insurance with a tax-advantaged savings component. Whole life coverage also lasts longer—the entire lifespan of the insured person—and tends to involve bigger dollar amounts, leading to a bigger payday for the agent. The question before buying such a policy is whether it's a better way to provide financial security for yourself than other options, such as securities or an annuity.

Blended Policy

When customers balk at the cost of a whole life plan, some agents may suggest a "blended" policy, essentially a hybrid of whole life and term insurance products. They get a smaller commission than when they sell a conventional whole life policy, but more than they would if you bought a term plan.

Typically, customers don't pay any more or less when they buy directly from a carrier or through a broker. The brokerage will split its commission with the life insurance agent, but the total amount of remuneration remains the same. If you value the personal service of a broker, you won't have to pay more to use one.

Annuities: A Lucrative Business

With more life insurance companies selling a variety of financial products today, agents often earn even more when they sell annuities. The fixed annuity, which pays the owner a set amount each year, is still the bread-and-butter of the industry. But many reps offer products that are more complex and often pay significantly higher commissions.

For example, a variable annuity offers a cash-balance feature where the payout depends in part on the performance of different stocks, bonds, and mutual funds selected by the owner. These policies can garner commissions of 5% of the invested amount, split roughly equally between the carrier and the selling agent. Meanwhile, the investor gets a product that frequently charges 2.3% of the account balance in annual fees—well above most mutual-fund expense ratios—and steep surrender charges of 6% to 8%.

Perhaps even more controversial is the equity-indexed annuity. Here, the return is based on how well a benchmark such as the S&P 500 fares over time. In addition to being relatively complex, these products have also caught flak for paying agents so generously. Sellers typically receive more than 5% commissions each time they sell one.

That doesn't mean most life insurance reps make massive incomes. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2020 median salary for insurance agents was a modest $52,180. The first several years of developing a customer base can be particularly challenging. Still, experts say that understanding the industry's payment model can help consumers appreciate why some agents may have a bias toward certain products over others.

The Bottom Line

When you're comparing different products, ask the agent or broker how much commission they make on each one. If they refuse to tell you, you might want to find someone who will. And, of course, shop around for quotes from several sources before buying any product.

What Are the Guidelines on a Typical Insurance Sales Commission?

Agents or brokers typically take more than half of the first year’s premium on the sale of a policy. That can amount to hundreds or even thousands of dollars, depending on the policy size. They often also receive so-called "renewal" commissions, which can amount to as much as 7.5% of premiums for the next nine years that you keep the policy. Beyond that, some policies give the agent a small "persistency" fee annually, also known as a residual.

What Are the Inherent Difficulties of a Job in Insurance Sales?

Agents are said to often burn out within a year because of the pressure to generate a minimum amount of sales. The field may also be saturated because no college diploma is required. Also, finding qualified customers is notoriously difficult. These may be among the reasons agents are paid high commissions.

What Should Buyers Be on the Lookout for With Respect to Annuities?

Annuities typically generate higher commissions than other insurance products. While the fixed annuity remains the industry mainstay, many reps offer products that are more complex and often pay significantly higher commissions. A variable annuity might garner commissions of 5% of the invested amount, split roughly equally between the carrier and the selling agent.

Article Sources
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  2. Costello Insurance Agency. "How we are paid for our services," Page 2. Accessed Sept. 22, 2021.

  3. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. "Joint SEC/NASD report on examination findings regarding broker-dealer sales of variable insurance products." Accessed Sept. 22, 2021.

  4. Insurance Information Institute. "Equity-Indexed Annuities: Fundamental Concepts and Issues," Page 42. Accessed Sept. 22, 2021.

  5. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Occupational Employment and Wages, April 2021: Insurance Sales Agents." Accessed Sept. 22, 2021.