A:

If a company has been delisted, it is no longer trading on a major exchange, but the owners of the company shares are not stripped of their status as owners. However, delisting often results in a significant or total devaluing of a company's share value. Therefore, although a shareholder's ownership of a company does not decrease after a company is delisted, that ownership may become worth much less or, in some cases, it may lose its entire value.

For further reading, see I own shares of a company that just received a delisting notice. Does this mean I will lose my shares?.

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