A:

Social responsibility in marketing is important because the practice involves focusing efforts on attracting consumers who want to make a positive difference with their purchases. Recyclable packaging, promotions that spread social awareness and portions of profits that benefit charitable groups are examples of social responsibility strategies.

Many companies have adopted social responsibility strategies in marketing as a means to help the community or produce services and products that benefit society. For example, marketing departments may launch a campaign that encourages consumers to buy a bundle of socks versus one pair and the company in turn donates a bundle of socks to military personnel overseas or to homeless shelters in the community. As a result of such generous donations the company brands itself as socially responsible and ethical, which ultimately attracts customers who are engaged in socially responsible commitments and who want to support the welfare of the community.

Corporate responsibility goes hand in hand with social responsibility practices. For example, administrators, executives, and shareholders and stakeholders must practice ethical behaviors and join the community in promoting responsible marketing efforts. Putting on appearances or greenwashing, the practice of deceptively promoting environmentally friendly processes or products, indicates to customers that the company is not committed to social responsibility and can ultimately hurt the brand and the company's success. Consumers often do their research and can see through gimmicks and slogans that are not genuine.

Although an initial investment may be involved to split portions of profits or donate to those in need, social responsibility in marketing promotes a positive company image, which can significantly impact productivity and profitability favorably.

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