A:

Prime costs and conversion costs are relied upon heavily in the manufacturing sector as a metric to determine efficiency in production of a specific product. Prime cost is defined as the expenditures directly related to creating finished products, while conversion costs are the expenses incurred when turning raw materials into a product. Prime costs and conversion costs include some of the same factors of production expenses, but each provides a different perspective into production efficiency.

Prime Costs

The calculation for prime cost includes the total amount spent on direct materials in addition to direct labor. Tangible components such as raw materials necessary to create a finished product are included in direct materials. For instance, the engine of a car or the spokes of a bicycle are included in direct material costs because they are each necessary to complete production of that specific item. Direct labor costs include the salary, wages or benefits paid to an employee who works on the completion of finished products. Compensation paid to machinists, painters or welders is common in calculating prime costs. Unlike conversion costs, prime costs do not include any indirect costs.

Prime costs are reviewed by operations managers to ensure the company has an efficient production process. The calculation of prime costs also helps organizations set prices at a level that produce an acceptable amount of profit.

Conversion Costs

Conversion costs include direct labor and overhead expenses incurred due to the transformation of raw materials into finished products. Overhead costs are defined as the expenses that cannot be directly attributed to the production process but are necessary for operations, such as electricity or other utilities required to keep a manufacturing plant functioning throughout the day. Direct labor costs are the same as those used in prime cost calculations.

Conversion costs are also used as a measure to gauge the efficiencies in production processes but take into account the overhead expenses left out of prime cost calculations. Operations managers also use conversion costs to determine where there may be waste within the manufacturing process.

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