A:

Warren Buffett may have been born with business in his blood. He purchased his first stock when he was 11 years old and worked in his family’s grocery store in Omaha. His father, Howard Buffett, owned a small brokerage, and Warren would spend his days watching what investors were doing and listening to what they said. As a teenager, he took odd jobs, from washing cars to delivering newspapers, using his savings to purchase several pinball machines that he placed in local businesses.

His entrepreneurial successes as a youth did not immediately translate into a desire to attend college. His father pressed him to continue his education, with Buffett reluctantly agreeing to attend the University of Pennsylvania. He then transferred to the University of Nebraska, where he graduated with a degree in business in three years.

After being rejected by the Harvard Business School, he enrolled in graduate studies at Columbia Business School. While there, he was taught by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd, both well-known securities analysts. It was under Graham that Buffett learned the fundamentals of value investing. He once stated in an interview that Graham's book, The Intelligent Investor, had changed his life and set him on the path of professional analysis to the investment markets.

Benjamin Graham and The Intelligent Investor

Graham is often called the "Dean of Wall Street" and the father of value investing. One of the most important early proponents of financial security analysis, Graham was so influential that he helped draft the Securities Act of 1933. He championed the idea that the investor should look at the market as though it were an actual entity and potential business partner – Graham called this entity "Mr. Market" – that sometimes asks for too much or too little money to be bought out.

It would be difficult to summarize all of Graham's theories in full. At its core, value investing is about identifying stocks that have been undervalued by the majority of stock market participants. He believed that stock prices were frequently wrong due to irrational and excessive price fluctuations (both upside and downside). Intelligent investors, said Graham, need to be firm in their principles and not follow the crowd.

Graham wrote "The Intelligent Investor" in 1949 as a guide for the common investor. The book championed the idea of buying low-risk securities in a highly diversified, mathematical way. Graham favored fundamental analysis, capitalizing on the difference between a stock's purchase price and its intrinsic value.

Entering the Investment Field

The Buffett that modern investors admire almost wasn’t. When he graduated from Columbia he intended to work on Wall Street, but Graham convinced him to make another career choice. Heading back to Omaha, Buffett worked as a stockbroker and opened several partnerships. The size of the investing partnerships grew substantially, and by the time he was 31 he was a millionaire.

It was at this point – in 1961 – that Buffett’s sights turned to directly investing in businesses. He made a $1 million investment in a windmill manufacturing company, and the next year in a bottling company. Buffett used the value-investing techniques he learned in school, as well as his knack for understanding the general business environment, to find bargains on the stock market. Looking for new opportunities, he discovered a textile manufacturing firm called Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A), and began buying shares in it. He later took control of the company in 1965. He made some other good investments, like American Express (AXP), a company that doubled in price within two years of his initial purchase of its stock.

Comparing Buffet to Graham

Buffett has referred to himself as "85% Graham." Like his mentor, he has focused on company fundamentals and a "stay the course" approach – an approach that enabled both men to build huge personal nest eggs. However, Buffett invests using a more qualitative and concentrated approach than Graham did. Graham preferred to find undervalued, average companies and diversify his holdings among them; Buffett favors quality businesses that have reasonable valuations and the ability for large growth.

Other differences lie in how to set intrinsic value, when to take a chance and how deeply to dive into a company that has potential. Graham relied on quantitative methods to a far greater extent than Buffett, who spends his time actually visiting companies, talking with management and understanding the corporate's particular business model. As a result, Graham was more able to and more comfortable investing in lots of smaller companies than Buffett. Consider a baseball analogy: Graham was concerned about swinging at good pitches and getting on base; Buffett prefers to wait for pitches that allow him to score a home run. Many have credited Buffett with having a natural gift for timing that cannot be replicated, whereas Graham's method is friendlier to the average investor.

The Bottom Line

Warren Buffett’s investments haven't always been successful, but they were well thought-out and followed value principles. By keeping an eye out for new opportunities and sticking to a consistent strategy, Buffett and the textile company he acquired long ago are considered by many to be one of the most successful investing stories of all time.

RELATED FAQS
  1. What are Warren Buffett's favorite business / finance books, and why?

    Read the books that taught master investor Warren Buffet everything he knows about the market, stocks, security analysis ... Read Answer >>
  2. How is Warren Buffett Plan Bequeathing his Estate?

    Find out how much Warren Buffett is leaving for his heirs and how he wants the funds invested after his death. Learn about ... Read Answer >>
  3. How does the "Buffett Premium" increase Berkshire Hathaway's stock price?

    Explore the theory that Berkshire Hathaway stock carries a Warren "Buffet Premium" that would disappear upon his death and ... Read Answer >>
  4. What's the largest charitable donation Warren Buffett ever made?

    Learn about Warren Buffett's biggest financial contributions and how his estate is to be divided between charity and Buffett's ... Read Answer >>
  5. What's the best way to contact Warren Buffett?

    Learn how to contact Warren Buffett and what kinds of contact is most likely to receive a response from him or from his company, ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is Warren Buffett's investment history with the Washington Post? (BRK.A, AMZN)

    Learn why one of the richest men in America passed up the opportunity to take over one of the nation's most celebrated and ... Read Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    3 Differences Between Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett

    Analyze three key differences between Warren Buffett and Benjamin Graham. Learn how value investing principles were applied differently by each investor.
  2. Investing

    Benjamin Graham 3 Most Timeless Investment Principles

    Investor Benjamin Graham pioneered cutting edge concepts that propelled other top investors to fame. Find out what are his three main investment principles.
  3. Insights

    4 Reasons Buffett's Portfolio Is Irrelevant to Today's Investors (AXP, KO)

    Find out why investors should not try to emulate Warren Buffett's stock portfolio and why they could not achieve his same level of success.
  4. Investing

    5 Great Investors Who Aren't Warren Buffett

    Here are five other investors, not named Warren Buffett, that are also considered to be the best of the best in the industry.
  5. Managing Wealth

    Buffett's early days as a value investor

    Warren Buffett has been honing his investing process for years.
  6. Investing

    Is Warren Buffett Really A Value Investor?

    Warren Buffett has long been hailed as a value investor. But is that statement still accurate?
  7. Managing Wealth

    Warren Buffett: How He Does It

    The Sage of Omaha has a careful methodology for evaluating value stocks.
  8. Investing

    Why Warren Buffett Envies You

    The Oracle of Omaha can move over - there's a new investor in town.
RELATED TERMS
  1. Benjamin Graham

    Benjamin Graham was an influential investor who is regarded as ...
  2. Graham Number

    The Graham number is the upper bound of the price range that ...
  3. Long-Term Growth - LTG

    Long-term growth (LTG) is an investing strategy and concept in ...
  4. Benjamin Method

    The investment approach that aims to follow the strategies implemented ...
  5. Net Current Asset Value Per Share - NCAVPS

    Net current asset value per share (NCAVPS) is a measure created ...
  6. Oracle Of Omaha

    The Oracle of Omaha is a nickname for Warren Buffett, who is ...
Hot Definitions
  1. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs are often issued by companies seeking the capital to expand ...
  2. Cost of Goods Sold - COGS

    Cost of goods sold (COGS) is the direct costs attributable to the production of the goods sold in a company.
  3. Profit and Loss Statement (P&L)

    A financial statement that summarizes the revenues, costs and expenses incurred during a specified period of time, usually ...
  4. Monte Carlo Simulation

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the probability of different outcomes in a process that cannot easily be predicted ...
  5. Price Elasticity of Demand

    Price elasticity of demand is a measure of the change in the quantity demanded or purchased of a product in relation to its ...
  6. Sharpe Ratio

    The Sharpe ratio is the average return earned in excess of the risk-free rate per unit of volatility or total risk.
Trading Center