Outstanding shares refers to stock that is currently held by investors, including shares held by the public and restricted shares that are owned by company officers and insiders. The number of outstanding shares can change in response to such events as the company issuing new shares, repurchasing existing shares and employee options being converted into shares. The weighted average shares outstanding, or the weighted average of outstanding shares, is a calculation that takes into consideration any changes in the number of outstanding shares over a specific reporting period.

In general, the weighted average is a mean value calculated by averaging each quantity against an assigned weighting to determine a relative importance of each quantity on the average. 

Weighted Average Number of Shares

The weighted average number of shares is determined by taking the number of outstanding shares and multiplying it by the percentage of the reporting period for which that number applies, and doing this for each period. In other words, the formula takes the number of shares outstanding during each month, weighted by the number of months that those shares were outstanding.

Weighted Average Cost Per Share

Investors may choose to use average weighted averages if they have compiled a position in a particular stock over a period of time. As stock prices change daily, the investor may want to calculate a weighted average of the share price he paid for the shares. In order to calculate the weighted average cost per share, the investor can multiply the number of shares acquired at each price by that price, add those values and then divide the total value by the total number of shares

Weighted averages may also be used in other aspects of finance, including calculating portfolio returns, inventory accounting and valuation. 

Weighted Average Shares Outstanding

The weighted average shares outstanding figure is used to calculate key financial metrics such as earnings per share. Basic EPS, for example, is calculated as follows:

Basic EPS = (net incomepreferred dividends) / weighted average shares outstanding

Basic Weighted Average Shares

Basic weighted average shares, on the other hand, represents the above-mentioned weighted average shares outstanding, less the dilution of stock options for a specific period. In "basic weighted average shares," the term "basic" essentially means non-dilutive. Dilution occurs when a company issues additional shares that reduce an existing investor's proportional ownership in the company. Companies that have simple capital structures only need to report basic EPS. Those with complex structures (those that have potential dilutive securities) must report both basic EPS and diluted EPS.

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  1. Weighted Average

    An average in which each quantity to be averaged is assigned ...
  2. Outstanding Shares

    Outstanding shares refer to a company's stock currently held ...
  3. Portfolio Weight

    The percentage composition of a particular holding in a portfolio. ...
  4. Weighted Average Market Capitalization

    The weighted average market capitalization is a stock market ...
  5. Fully Diluted Shares

    The total number of shares that would be outstanding if all possible ...
  6. Weighted Average Credit Rating

    The weighted average credit rating is the weighted average rating ...
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