A Bank Guarantee vs. a Letter of Credit: An Overview

A bank guarantee and a letter of credit are both promises from a financial institution that a borrower will be able to repay a debt to another party, no matter what the debtor's financial circumstances. While different, both bank guarantees and letters of credit assure a third party that if the borrowing party can't repay what it owes, the financial institution will step in on behalf of the borrower. By providing financial backing for the borrowing party (often at the request of the other one), these promises serve to reduce risk factors, encouraging the transaction to proceed. But they work in slightly different ways and in different situations.

Letters of credit are especially important in international trade due to the distance involved, the potentially differing laws in the countries of the businesses involved, and the difficulty of the parties meeting in person. While letters of credit are used mostly in global transactions, bank guarantees are often used in real estate contracts and infrastructure projects.

A Bank Guarantee

Bank guarantees represent a more significant contractual obligation for banks than letters of credit do. A bank guarantee, like a letter of credit, guarantees a sum of money to a beneficiary; however, unlike a letter of credit, the sum is only paid if the opposing party does not fulfill the stipulated obligations under the contract. This can be used to essentially ensure a buyer or seller from loss or damage due to nonperformance by the other party in a contract.

Bank guarantees protect both parties in a contractual agreement from credit risk.

For instance, a construction company and its cement supplier may enter into a new contract to build a mall. Both parties may have to issue bank guarantees to prove their financial bona fides and capability. In a case where the supplier fails to deliver cement within a specified time, the construction company would notify the bank, which then pays the company the amount specified in the bank guarantee.

A Letter of Credit

Sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, a letter of credit acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, usually a bank or credit union. It guarantees a buyer's payment to a seller or a borrower's payment to a lender will be received on time and for the full amount. It also states that if the buyer can't make payment on the purchase, the bank will cover the full or remaining amount owed.

A letter of credit represents an obligation taken on by a bank to make a payment once certain criteria are met. After these terms are completed and confirmed, the bank will transfer the funds. The letter of credit ensures the payment will be made as long as the services are performed.

For example, say a U.S. wholesaler receives an order from a new client, a Canadian company. Because the wholesaler has no way of knowing whether this new client can fulfill its payment obligations, it requests a letter of credit is provided in the purchasing contract.

The purchasing company applies for a letter of credit at a bank where it already has funds or a line of credit (LOC). The bank issuing the letter of credit holds payment on behalf of the buyer until it receives confirmation that the goods in the transaction have been shipped. After the goods have been shipped, the bank would pay the wholesaler its due as long as the terms of the sales contract are met, such as delivery before a certain time or confirmation from the buyer that the goods were received undamaged.

Basically, the letter of credit substitutes the bank's credit for that of its client, ensuring correct and timely payment.

Special Considerations

Both bank guarantees and letters of credit work to reduce the risk in a business agreement or deal. Parties are more likely to agree to the transaction because they have less liability when a letter of credit or bank guarantee is active. These agreements are particularly important and useful in what would otherwise be risky transactions, such as certain real estate and international trade contracts.

Banks thoroughly screen clients interested in one of these documents. After the bank has determined that the applicant is creditworthy and has a reasonable risk, a monetary limit is placed on the agreement. The bank agrees to be obligated up to, but not exceeding, the limit. This protects the bank by providing a specific threshold of risk. 

One might say letters of credit ensure a transaction proceeds as planned, while bank guarantees reduce the loss if the transaction doesn't go as planned.

Key Takeaways

  • A bank guarantee is a promise from a lending institution that ensures that if a debtor can't cover a debt, the bank will step up.
  • Letters of credit are also financial promises on behalf of one party in a transaction and are especially significant in international trade.
  • Bank guarantees are often used in real estate contracts and infrastructure projects, while letters of credit are used mostly in global transactions.