ARTICLE 3: GROUNDS FOR DISCIPLINE

Misconduct by a Respondent, individually or in concert with others, including the following acts or omissions, shall constitute grounds for discipline, whether or not the act or omission occurred in the course of a client relationship:

(a) Any act or omission that violates the provisions of the Code of Ethics and/or Rules of Conduct;

(b) Any act or omission that fails to comply with the Practice Standards;

(c) Any act or omission that violates the criminal laws of any State or of the United States or of any province, territory or jurisdiction of any other country, provided however, that conviction thereof in a criminal proceeding shall not be a prerequisite to the institution of disciplinary proceedings, and provided further, that acquittal in a criminal proceeding shall not bar a disciplinary action;

(d) Any act that is the proper basis for professional discipline, as defined herein, provided professional discipline shall not be a prerequisite to the institution of disciplinary proceedings, and provided further, that dismissal of charges in a professional discipline proceeding shall not necessarily bar a disciplinary action;

(e) Any act or omission that violates these Disciplinary Rules or that violates an order of discipline;

(f) Failure to respond to a request by CFP Board staff, or obstruction of the DEC, or any panel thereof, or CFP Board staff in the performance of its or their duties;

(g) Any false or misleading statement made to CFP Board.

The enumeration of the foregoing acts and omissions constituting grounds for discipline is not exclusive and other acts or omissions amounting to unprofessional conduct may constitute grounds for discipline.

 

 

Article 4: Forms Of Discipline

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