Income Funds
Equity income funds invest in companies that pay higher rate of cash  dividends. Many of the holdings will be in preferred shares and common shares of  mature companies that have less potential for capital appreciation but also are more stable than growth companies. These funds may also include securities from industries that traditionally pay higher dividends than other sectors, such as utilities, REITs, energy stocks and financials. The primary investment objective is current income.

Growth and Income Funds
Growth and income funds will invest both common and preferred shares. The growth objective will be met by investing in the common shares of companies that show higher prospects for earnings growth and share appreciation. The preferred shares, shares in utility companies and high dividned paying shares will be included in the portfolio to meet the portfolio's income objective. An investor who purchases a growth and income fund has both capital appreciation and current income as investment objectives.

Growth Funds
Growth fund managers will add stocks to the fund portfolio that show high probability of capital appreciation. Since growth stocks are more volatile than other stocks, growth funds are suitable for investors who have long-term investment goals and can tolerate fluctuations in principal.

Aggressive Growth Funds
Aggressive growth funds are similar to growth funds, except they invest in companies that are less well-established and that possess certain financial qualities that are inherent in their business models and that make them even more volatile than growth stocks. The goal of these funds is to provide maximum capital appreciation through growth, emerging growth and small-cap stocks. Clients for whom aggressive growth funds are recommended must have a high tolerance for risk.

Specialized Funds

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