1. Market Crashes: Introduction
  2. Market Crashes: What are Crashes and Bubbles?
  3. Market Crashes: The Tulip and Bulb Craze (1630s)
  4. Market Crashes: The South Sea Bubble (1711)
  5. Market Crashes: The Florida Real Estate Craze (1926)
  6. Market Crashes: The Great Depression (1929)
  7. Market Crashes: The Crash of 1987
  8. Market Crashes: The Asian Crisis (1997)
  9. Market Crashes: The Dotcom Crash (2000-2002)
  10. Market Crashes: Housing Bubble and Credit Crisis (2007-2009)
  11. Market Crashes: Conclusion

In the hope of helping you avoid encasing your life savings in the next bubble or contributing to the next crash, we'll be looking at the crème de la crème of crashes as a cautionary tale. Welcome to our feature dedicated to the biggest market crashes in history.


Market Crashes: What are Crashes and Bubbles?
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