5 Tips For Reading A Balance Sheet

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Reading The Balance Sheet

A balance sheet, also known as a "statement of financial position", reveals a company's assets, liabilities and owners' equity (net worth). The balance sheet, together with the income statement and cash flow statement, make up the cornerstone of any company's financial statements. If you are a shareholder of a company, it is important that you understand how the balance sheet is structured, how to analyze it and how to read it.

1. The Balance Sheet Equation

The main formula behind balance sheets is: Assets = Liabilities + Shareholders' Equity

This means that assets, or the means used to operate the company, are balanced by a company's financial obligations along with the equity investment brought into the company and its retained earnings. The total assets must equal the liabilities plus the equity of the company.

 

2. Know The Current Assets

Current assets have a life span of one year or less, meaning they can be converted easily into cash. Such assets classes include cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and inventory. Cash, the most fundamental of current assets, also includes non-restricted bank accounts and checks. Cash equivalents are very safe assets that can be readily converted into cash; U.S. Treasuries are one such example. Accounts receivables consist of the short-term obligations owed to the company by its clients. Companies often sell products or services to customers on credit; these obligations are considered as current assets. When a client pays, theres a transaction from accounts receivables to cash.

3. Know The Non-Current Assets

Non-current assets are assets that are not turned into cash as easily, and are expected to be turned into cash within a year and/or have a life-span of more than a year. They can refer to tangible assets such as machinery, computers, buildings and land. Non-current assets can also be intangible, such as goodwill, patents or copyright. While these assets are not physical in nature, they are often the resources that can make or break a company - for example the value of a brand name. Depreciation is calculated and deducted from most of these assets, which represents the economic cost of the asset over its useful life.
 

4. Learn The Different Liabilities

On the other side of the balance sheet equation are the liabilities. These are the financial obligations a company owes to outside parties. Like assets, they can be both current and long-term. Long-term liabilities are debts and other non-debt financial obligations, which are due after a period of at least one year from the date of the balance sheet. Current liabilities are the company's liabilities which will come due, or must be paid, within one year. This is includes both shorter term borrowings, such as accounts payables, along with the current portion of longer term borrowing, such as the latest interest payment on a 10-year loan.

5. Learn about Shareholders' Equity

Shareholders' equity is the initial amount of money invested into a business. If, at the end of the fiscal year, a company decides to reinvest its net earnings into the company (after taxes), these retained earnings will be transferred from the income statement onto the balance sheet into the shareholder's equity account. This account represents a company's total net worth. In order for the balance sheet to balance, total assets on one side have to equal total liabilities plus shareholders' equity on the other.

6. Analyze With Ratios

Financial ratio analysis uses formulas to gain insight into the company and its operations. For the balance sheet, using financial ratios (like the debt-to-equity ratio) can show you a better idea of the company's financial condition along with its operational efficiency. It is important to note that some ratios will need information from more than one financial statement, such as from the balance sheet and the income statement. (See also: 6 Basic Financial Ratios and What They Reveal)

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