All standardized option contracts are issued and their performance is guaranteed by the Options Clearing Corporation (The OCC). Standardized options trade on the exchanges such as the Chicago Board Options Exchange CBOE, NYSE ARCA, NYSE AMEX and the NASDQ OMX / PHLX.

All option contracts are for one round lot of the underlying stock or 100 shares. To determine the amount that an investor either paid or received for the contract, take the premium and multiply it by 100. If an investor paid $4 for 1 KLM August 70 call, they paid $400 for the right to buy 100 shares of KLM at $70 per share until August. If another investor paid $2 for 1 JTJ May 50 put, they paid $200 for the right to sell 100 shares of JTJ at $50 until May.

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Managing An Option Position

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