The acceptance of bids and offers for exchange-listed options are filled on a first come first serve basis with the highest bid or lowest offer being filled first. Customer orders that are entered at the same price as a member’s order will be given priority over the member’s order. If two member orders are competing at the same price, priority will be given to the member order that was entered first. Spread orders are given priority over single option orders.

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Frequently Asked Questions
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    These numbers are called the bid and ask sizes, and represent the aggregate number of pending trades at the given bid and ...
  2. What is the Exponential Moving Average (EMA) formula and how is the EMA calculated?

    Learn the formula for calculating both simple moving averages and exponential moving averages, indicators that are frequently ...
  3. I placed a limit order to buy a stock after the market closed, but the stock's price gapped above the entry price and my order never got filled. How can I prevent this from happening?

    You can minimize the chances of this situation happening if you understand two types of orders: the buy-stop order and the ...
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    Learn what the difference between A-shares and H-shares of publicly listed companies in China and Hong Kong stock exchange. ...
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