DEFINITION of 'Admitted Assets'

Assets of an insurance company that are permitted by state law to be included in the company's financial statements. Although each state has discretion over its own insurance laws, there is a general consensus over which assets are suitable to use when determining the insurance company's solvency.

BREAKING DOWN 'Admitted Assets'

Admitted assets generally include assets that are liquid and whose value can be assessed, or receivables that can reasonably be expected to be paid. Since admitted assets are a critical component for computing capital adequacy to state insurance regulators, they have a much narrower definition than might be applied under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).

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