What is an 'Alien Corporation'

An alien corporation is a corporation that was created in another country. They are most commonly classified as any corporation that is formed outside of the United States. Other countries do not refer to U.S.-based corporations with this term.

BREAKING DOWN 'Alien Corporation'

Alien corporations are also referred to as foreign corporations. However, they are technically distinct from these entities. Most states in the U.S. consider a foreign corporation to be one that was merely established in another state.

Example of an Alien Corporation

For example, a company's home office is located in another country, and its casualty insurance business is conducted in Utah. In Utah, this company would be referred to as an alien insurer.

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