DEFINITION of 'Analyst Meeting'

An analyst meeting is an annual gathering held by publicly traded corporations where the company executives provide information about how the company is performing and its future prospects. They may also choose to answer questions from analysts and investors. Some companies make their meetings widely available via webcast and/or podcast.

BREAKING DOWN 'Analyst Meeting'

Analyst meetings are just one of many ways corporations provide transparency for their performance figures. Publicly available Securities and Exchange Commission filings required by the federal government, such as the 10-K and 10-Q reports, provide information about a company's major developments, competition, legal proceedings, management, research and development, business segments and financials. Annual reports are another way public companies communicate with shareholders about the company's operations and financial strength.

Topics Discussed at an Analyst Meeting

Topics discussed at analyst meetings range from merger and acquisition activity, divestitures, exciting new products, services, or alliances, and general accounting and financial management issues. The general theme of a meeting takes on the topics and issues most relevant to analysts and strategists in any given year to the next.

There's no formal template; some meetings are rather sparse, with little in the way of traditional conference fixings, while at other times, companies may roll out the red carpet to introduce a blockbuster opportunity. In one form or another, all meetings are an extension of the corporate relations function. Thus, some companies treat this as an essential element of their corporate communications, including the budget to host high production value events.

At times, analyst meetings have come under fire because it's thought it disproportionally favors securities insiders. Companies hosting analyst meetings go to great lengths not to give the impression they're allowing preferential access to insiders or strategic relationships. Public relations, investor relations and corporate communications all play an essential role in creating and delivering careful messaging for analysts and various stakeholders.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Analyst Expectation

    An analyst expectation is a report indicating how a particular ...
  2. Annual

    The term "annual" refers to an event that occurs once a year.
  3. Investment Analyst

    An investment analyst is a financial professional with expertise ...
  4. Research Analyst

    A research analyst is a person who prepares investigative reports ...
  5. Earnings Call

    Earnings call is a conference call between a public company, ...
  6. Public Company

    A public company issues securities through an initial public ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What You Need To Know About Financial Analysts

    Thinking about relying on analyst recommendations for your next trade? We'll show you what to watch out for.
  2. Financial Advisor

    Becoming a financial analyst

    Understand the types of career paths you can take as a financial analyst and learn the education and skills you need to launch a career in this field.
  3. Financial Advisor

    Career advice: Financial analyst versus research analyst

    Read an in-depth comparison between a career as a financial analyst and a career as a research analyst, including advice on which one to choose.
  4. Personal Finance

    A career as financial analyst or business analyst?

    Understand the key distinctions between a financial analyst and a business analyst, including starting pay and job outlook.
  5. Investing

    Stock analysts say a lot, but should you listen?

    If you want to find out which analysts are worth following, you shouldn't take their word for it.
  6. Personal Finance

    Mergers and Acquisitions Analysts: What They Do, How Much They Make

    Mergers and acquisitions analysts perform the analysis and modeling to support buying, selling, restructuring, and combining companies.
  7. Personal Finance

    Career advice: Financial analyst versus data analyst

    Learn the distinctions between financial analysts and data analysts, and determine which career is right for you based on your skill set and interests.
  8. Personal Finance

    Career advice: Financial analyst versus equity analyst

    Understand the subtle distinctions between financial analysts and equity analysts, and learn the pros and cons of each career.
  9. Personal Finance

    Revenue Analyst: Career Path & Qualifications

    Learn more about the duties of a revenue analyst and the qualifications needed for the position, along with the career path for these professionals.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What kinds of financial analysis jobs are there?

    Read about some of the different types of financial analysts, including those considered to be on the buy side and those ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are the differences between a 10-K report and a firm's own annual report?

    Understand the key differences between a corporation's own annual report and its 10-K report filed with the SEC and how investors ... Read Answer >>
  3. How can I access a company's earnings report?

    Find out how to access the quarterly and annual earnings reports for publicly traded companies, and even how to listen in ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a buy-side analyst and a sell-side analyst?

    The main difference between a buy-side analyst and sell-side analyst is the type of firm that employs them and the people ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Diversification

    Diversification is the strategy of investing in a variety of securities in order to lower the risk involved with putting ...
  2. Intrinsic Value

    Intrinsic value is the perceived or calculated value of a company, including tangible and intangible factors, and may differ ...
  3. Current Assets

    Current assets is a balance sheet item that represents the value of all assets that can reasonably expected to be converted ...
  4. Volatility

    Volatility measures how much the price of a security, derivative, or index fluctuates.
  5. Money Market

    The money market is a segment of the financial market in which financial instruments with high liquidity and very short maturities ...
  6. Cost of Debt

    Cost of debt is the effective rate that a company pays on its current debt as part of its capital structure.
Trading Center