DEFINITION of 'Bankmail'

An agreement made between a company planning a takeover and a bank, which prevents the bank from financing any other potential acquirer's bid.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bankmail'

Bankmail agreements are meant to stop other potential acquirers from receiving similar financing arrangements.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. A Hostile Takeover vs. Friendly Takeover

    Learn about the difference between a hostile takeover and a friendly takeover, and understand how proxy fights and tender ... Read Answer >>
  2. How can a company resist a hostile takeover?

    Learn about some of the defensive strategies a public company's board of directors might utilize to prevent a hostile bidder ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is finance?

    Finance is the study of how money is managed and the process of acquiring needed funds. Personal finance, corporate finance ... Read Answer >>
  4. What happens to the shares of a company that has been the object of a hostile takeover?

    Learn about the effect on the share price of companies that are targets of hostile takeovers, which are tactics used by famed ... Read Answer >>
  5. What do the numbers after the bid and ask numbers in stock quotes mean?

    These numbers are called the bid and ask sizes, and they represent the aggregate number of pending trades at the given bid ... Read Answer >>
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