What is 'Below the Market'

Below the market can refer to any type of purchase or investment that is made at a below the market price. In investment trading, a below the market order is an order to buy or sell a security at a price that is lower than the current market price. In broader terms, below the market can also be a price or rate that is lower than the current prevailing conditions in an open market. Goods or services that are offered at a lower price than the "going," or typical, rate can be said to be below the market.

BREAKING DOWN 'Below the Market'

Below the market purchases are an advantage to the buyer because they are able to obtain goods, services or investments at a price that is lower than the going rate. Below the market is a common term that can be used by investors and investment traders.

Below the Market Trade Orders

Traders and investors may have several platforms available when seeking to execute a trade. Institutional investors can often access a variety of public and non-public trading centers. Retail investors will typically execute their trades through a discount brokerage platform or contact their broker for placing a trade. In nearly all of these situations, each investor has the option to choose the maximum price they are willing to pay.

In a below the market order an investor who wants to try to achieve a better price or position may enter an order to buy securities at a price that is below the market. Generally trading platforms will specify an order with a designated price as a limit order.

In a limit order the investor communicates a maximum price they are willing to pay to purchase a security. Placing a below the market limit order will have a much higher risk of being unfulfilled in the open market. If the day’s price on the specified security never falls below its current trading price or if it increases, the limit order will not be placed and the investor takes no ownership in the security. If the limit order to buy is filled, the order will be place at the specified price. In some trades only a portion of the shares may be purchased if the broker is not able to identify sellers for the full lot of requested shares.

Limit orders that allow investors to specify a below the market price for buying a security will differ from standard market orders. Standard market orders are generally a trading platform’s defaulted order type. With a standard market order an investor in a highly liquid stock would usually obtain the desired number of shares immediately at the current market price.

RELATED TERMS
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