DEFINITION of 'Blanket Recommendation'

A situation in which a financial professional or institution sends a recommendation to all clients to buy or sell a particular security or product, regardless of whether or not the particular asset is compatible with the client's investment goals, objectives and risk tolerance.

BREAKING DOWN 'Blanket Recommendation'

Communicating to clients through a blanket recommendation is usually ill-advised because the clients solicited will have varying investment profiles. Imagine if a particular client who is retired and can't afford to lose a lot of money is the recipient of a blanket recommendation and the recommended transaction is of higher risk than what she is used to. Should the client follow the firm's advice, she stands to lose a portion of the savings it has taken her years to accumulate, which would be very difficult to replenish.

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