Loading the player...

What is a 'Bond Fund'

A bond fund is a fund invested primarily in bonds and other debt instruments. The exact type of debt the fund invests in will depend on its focus, but investments may include government, corporate, municipal and convertible bonds, in addition to other debt securities like mortgage-backed securities (MBS).

A bond fund an also be referred to as a debt fund.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bond Fund'

A bond fund is simply a mutual fund that invests solely in bonds. For many investors, a bond fund is a more efficient way of investing in bonds than buying individual bond securities. Unlike individual bond securities, bond funds do not have a maturity date for the repayment of principal, therefore, the principal amount invested may fluctuate from time to time. In addition, investors indirectly participate in the interest paid by the underlying bond securities held in the mutual fund. Interest payments are made monthly and reflect the mix of all the different bonds in the fund, which means that the interest income distribution will vary monthly. An investor who invests in a bond fund is putting his money into a pool managed by a portfolio manager. Typically, a bond fund manager buys and sells according to market conditions and rarely holds bonds until maturity.

Most bond funds are comprised of a certain type of bond, such as corporate or government bonds, and are further defined by time period to maturity, such as short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term. Some bond funds comprise of only safe bonds, such as government bonds. Investors should note that US government bonds are considered to be of the highest credit quality and are not subject to ratings. In effect, bond funds that specialize in US Treasury securities, including Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS), are the safest, but offer the lowest potential return. Other funds invest in only the riskiest category of bonds, that is, high-yield or junk bonds. Bond funds that invest in more volatile types of bonds tend to offer higher potential returns. Still, other bond funds have a mix of the different types of bonds in order to create multi-asset class options. For investors interested in bonds, a Morningstar bond style box can be used to sort out the investing options available for bond funds. The types of bond funds available include: US government bond funds, municipal bond funds, corporate bond funds, mortgage-backed securities (MBS) funds, high-yield bond funds, emerging market bond funds, and global bond funds.

Bond funds are attractive investment options as they are usually easier for investors to participate in than purchasing the individual bond instruments that make up the bond portfolio. By investing in a bond fund, an investor need only pay the annual expense ratio that covers marketing, administrative and professional management fees, compared with purchasing multiple bonds separately and dealing with the transaction costs associated with each. Bond funds provide instant diversification for investors for a low required minimum investment - since a fund usually has a pool of different bonds of varying maturities, the impact of any single bond’s performance is lessened if that issuer should fail to pay interest or principal. Another benefit of a bond fund is that it provides access to professional portfolio managers that have the expertise to research and analyze the credit worthiness of bond issuers and market conditions before buying into or selling out of the fund. For example, a fund manager may replace bonds when the issuer's credit is downgraded or when the issuer "calls," or pays off the bond before the maturity date. Bond funds can be sold at any time for their current market net asset value (NAV), which may result in a capital gain or loss. Individual bonds can be harder to unload. From a tax perspective, some investors in higher tax brackets may find that they have a higher after-tax yield from a tax-free municipal bond fund investment instead of a taxable bond fund investment.

Due to the inverse relationship between interest rates and bond prices, a bond due to mature in the long-term has greater interest rate risk than a short-term bond. Therefore, the NAV of bond funds with longer term maturities will be impacted greatly by changes in interest rates. This, in turn, will affect how much interest income the fund can distribute to its participants monthly.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Bond

    A bond is a fixed income investment in which an investor loans ...
  2. Total Bond Fund

    A total bond fund is a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund that ...
  3. Corporate Bond

    A corporate bond is a debt security issued by a corporation and ...
  4. U.S. Savings Bonds

    A U.S. savings bond is a government bond that offers a fixed ...
  5. Discount Bond

    A discount bond is a bond that is issued for less than its par ...
  6. Fixed-Rate Bond

    A fixed-rate bond is a bond that pays the same amount of interest ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Corporate Bond Basics: Learn to Invest

    Understand the basics of corporate bonds to increase your chances of positive returns.
  2. Investing

    Corporate Bonds for Retirement Accounts

    Corporate bonds are usually the preferred choice in retirement accounts. Here are some of the benefits of corporate bonds, and strategies for a portfolio.
  3. Investing

    Why Muni Bonds and Bond Funds are Perfect Together

    Municipal bonds and bond funds differ in several ways, which is partly why they complement each other well.
  4. Investing

    The Top 5 Long-Term Bond Funds for 2016

    Understand how long-term bond mutual funds can benefit an investor's portfolio, and learn the best long-term bond mutual funds for 2016.
  5. Investing

    The Basics Of Bonds

    Bonds play an important part in your portfolio as you age; learning about them makes good financial sense.
  6. Investing

    6 Ways That Investors Use Bonds

    Learn how the stodgy stereotype of bonds can overshadow the basic and advanced uses of what these investments can do for your portfolio.
  7. Retirement

    How to Pick the Right Bonds For Your IRA

    Learn about the best types of bonds to include in an IRA depending on an investor's risk tolerance. Understand the tax benefits of holding bonds in an IRA.
  8. Investing

    Evaluating Bond Funds: Keeping It Simple

    Discover some of the key factors for determining a bond fund's risk-return profile.
  9. Investing

    Find the Right Bond at the Right Time

    Learn about the types of bonds you should consider investing in, when you should be buying them and how to compare yields against their time to maturity.
Hot Definitions
  1. Current Assets

    Current assets is a balance sheet account that represents the value of all assets that can reasonably expected to be converted ...
  2. Volatility

    Volatility measures how much the price of a security, derivative, or index fluctuates.
  3. Money Market

    The money market is a segment of the financial market in which financial instruments with high liquidity and very short maturities ...
  4. Cost of Debt

    Cost of debt is the effective rate that a company pays on its current debt as part of its capital structure.
  5. Depreciation

    Depreciation is an accounting method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life and is used to account ...
  6. Ratio Analysis

    A ratio analysis is a quantitative analysis of information contained in a company’s financial statements.
Trading Center