DEFINITION of 'Canadian Council Of Insurance Regulators - CCIR '

An association that was created to advocate for an effective regulatory system in Canada. In addition, the CCIR frequently works jointly with other financial regulators to improve consumer protection laws and to promote harmonization of regulations across various jurisdictions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Canadian Council Of Insurance Regulators - CCIR '

The Canadian Councile of Insurance Regulators (CCIR) represents regulators from the federal government, and each province and territory. The CCIR works collaboratively with these agencies to create solutions to regulatory issues in Canada.

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