What is 'Canadian Securities Institute (CSI)'

The Canadian Securities Institute is Canada's leading provider of professional credentials and compliance programs for the financial services industry. The Canadian Securities Institute was created in 1970 and has served an excess of 700,000 professionals over more than four decades. The non-profit Canadian Securities Institute was transformed into the for-profit CSI Global Solutions in 2003. CSI offers over 170 courses for the securities, wealth management, commercial banking and insurance industries. It is the sole provider of the well-recognized Canadian Securities Course, the basic requirement for qualification as a licensed securities dealer in Canada.

BREAKING DOWN 'Canadian Securities Institute (CSI)'

Through its global partners, CSI also provides financial proficiency training in a number of regions across the world including China, Europe, the Middle East, the Caribbean and Central America.

In November 2010, CSI was acquired by Moody's Corporation for C$155 million and commenced operating as a separate company within Moody's Analytics.

Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC), Canada's stock exchanges and Canada's securities regulatory commissions all endorse the CSI.

Canadian Securities Institute Educational Programs

CSI sets the standard for financial services education in Canada as the most experienced and trusted educator endorsed by regulatory authorities across Canada. The Canadian Securities Institute offers 100 courses, 11 certificate programs, specialized designations, as well as continuing education programs for Canadian financial professionals, primarily in the area of financial advice.

Since it was established in 1970 as the Canadian Securities Institute, over three-quarters of a million financial professionals have chosen CSI for their career training and development. CSI has earned its reputation by creating relevant, real-world training courses and assessments, innovative educational offerings and expertise ranging from securities to mutual funds, from banking and trusts to insurance, from portfolio management to financial planning and wealth management.

The Canadian Securities Course is widely viewed by Canada's financial services sector as the de facto entry requirement for many careers. First offered in 1964, it has remained an exclusive part of the proficiency requirement to be registered as an investment advisor with an IIROC member firm. The CSC is recognized as a requirement for mutual fund representatives and exempt market dealer representatives. CSI also provides a simplified version for motivated investors who wish to increase their financial literacy/knowledge but do not plan a career as stockbrokers.

CSI offers programs and courses through a variety of formats, including distance (primarily online) and classroom instruction. To make classes as accessible as possible, some courses have been made available through Ontario community colleges.

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