DEFINITION of 'Clearing House Funds'

Money that passes between Federal Reserve Banks in the form of personal or business checks prior to approval of credit. These funds are in the process of clearing and reconciliation through a central processing mechanism. Because of this, they are often not available for withdrawal on the day of deposit.

BREAKING DOWN 'Clearing House Funds'

Clearing house funds differ from federal funds, which settle on the same day. Because clearing house funds are not drawn on reserves like federal funds, they generally take at least three days to clear. Clearing house funds are also used to settle any transaction on which there is one day's float.

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