What is 'Continuous Net Settlement - CNS'

Continuous Net Settlement (CNS) is a settlement process used by the National Securities Clearing Corporation (NSCC) for the clearing and settlement of securities transactions. CNS includes an automated book-entry accounting system that centralizes the settlement of transactions, keeping the flows of security and money balances orderly and efficient.

BREAKING DOWN 'Continuous Net Settlement - CNS'

During the CNS process, reports are generated that document the movements of money and securities. This system processes most broker-to-broker transactions in the United States that involve equities, corporate and municipal bonds, American depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds, and unit investment trusts. NSCC is a subsidiary of the Depository Trust Clearing Corporation (DTCC).

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