DEFINITION of 'Credit Default Insurance'

The use of a financial agreement - usually a credit derivative such as a credit default swap, total return swap, or credit linked note - to mitigate the risk of loss from default by a borrower or bond issuer.

BREAKING DOWN 'Credit Default Insurance'

Credit default insurance allows for the transfer of credit risk without the transfer of an underlying asset. The most widely used type of credit default insurance is a credit default swap. Credit default swaps transfer credit risk only; they do not transfer interest rate risk. Total return swaps transfer both credit and interest rate risk.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Who is the counterparty of a derivative?

    Learn about the counterparty to a derivative contract, and how derivative swap agreements traded over the counter have counterparty ... Read Answer >>
  2. When was the first swap agreement and why were swaps created?

    Learn about the history of swap agreements, the first swap agreement between IBM and the World Bank, and how swaps have evolved ... Read Answer >>
  3. In what types of financial situations would credit spread risk be applied instead ...

    Find out when credit risk is realized as spread risk and when it is realized as default risk, and learn why market participants ... Read Answer >>
  4. What would motivate an entity to enter into a swap agreement?

    Learn why parties enter into swap agreements to hedge their risks, and understand how the different legs of a swap agreement ... Read Answer >>
  5. Should you calculate Value at Risk (VaR) for counterparty credit risk?

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  6. How are swap agreements financed?

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