What is a 'Deep-Discount Bond'

A deep-discount bond that sells at a significant discount from par value.

2. A bond that is selling at a discount from par value and has a coupon rate significantly less than the prevailing rates of fixed-income securities with a similar risk profile.

BREAKING DOWN 'Deep-Discount Bond'

1. Typically, a deep-discount bond will have a market price of 20% or more below its face value. These bonds are perceived to be riskier than similar bonds and are thus priced accordingly.

2. These low-coupon bonds are typically long term and issued with call provisions. Investors are attracted to these discounted bonds because of their high return or minimal chance of being called before maturity.

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