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What is 'Delivered Duty Unpaid - DDU'

Delivered Duty Unpaid is an international trade term indicating that the seller is responsible for making a safe delivery of goods to a named destination, paying all transportation expenses and assuming all risks during transportation; once the goods arrive at the agreed-upon location, the buyer becomes responsible for paying import duties as well as further transport costs.

BREAKING DOWN 'Delivered Duty Unpaid - DDU'

Delivered Duty Unpaid (DDU) was not included in the most recent (2010) edition of the International Chamber of Commerce's Incoterms, but it is still used in international trade parlance. The official term that best describes the function of DDU is currently Delivery at Place (DAP). On paper, the term is followed by the location of delivery, for example, "DDU: Port of Los Angeles." 

According to DDU arrangements, the seller secures licenses and takes care of other formalities involved in exporting a good; they are also responsible for all licenses and costs incurred in transit countries, as well as providing an invoice at their own cost. The seller assumes all risk until the goods are delivered at the specified location, but they have no obligation to obtain insurance on the goods. 

The buyer is responsible for obtaining all necessary licenses for importing the goods and paying all relevant taxes, duties and inspection costs. All risks involved in this process are borne by the buyer. Once the goods are placed at the disposal of the buyer, all further transportation costs and risks fall on them.

ICC and Incoterms

​The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is an organization that was originally formed after World War I with the goal of helping to foster prosperity in Europe by setting standards for international trade. It was this group that in 1936 that published a set of standardized terms for different types of shipping agreements, known as Incoterms.

Incoterms are contract specifications outlining who bears the costs and risks of international transactions; they are subject to change at the discretion of the ICC (note that DDU has not been an official Incoterm since 2010). Because of the legal and logistical intricacies of international shipping, the ICC seeks to simplify matters for businesses by standardizing its terms.

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