What is an 'Error Term'

An error term is a variable in a statistical or mathematical model, which is created when the model does not fully represent the actual relationship between the independent variables and the dependent variables. As a result of this incomplete relationship, the error term is the amount at which the equation may differ during empirical analysis. The error term is also known as the residual, disturbance or remainder term.

BREAKING DOWN 'Error Term'

An error term represents the margin of error within a statistical model, referring to the sum of the deviations within the regression line, that provides an explanation for the difference between the results of the model and actually observed results. The regression line is used as a point of analysis when attempting to determine the correlation between one independent variable and one dependent variable.

The error term essentially means that the model is not completely accurate and results in differing results during real-world applications. For example, assume there is a multiple linear regression function that takes the form:

Error Term


When the actual Y differs from the Y in the model during an empirical test, then the error term does not equal 0, which means there are other factors that influence Y.

Within a linear regression model that is tracking a stock’s price over time, the error term is the difference between the expected price at a particular time and the price that was actually observed. In instances where the price is exactly what was anticipated at a particular time, it will fall on the trend line and the error term is zero.

Points that do not fall directly on the trend line exhibit the fact that the dependent variable, in this case the price, is influenced by more than just the independent variable, representing the passage of time. The error term stands for any influence being exerted on the price variable, such as changes in market sentiment.

The two data points with the greatest distance from the trend line should be an equal distance from the trend line, representing the largest margin of error.

Linear Regression, Error Term and Stock Analysis

Linear regression is a form of analysis that relates to current trends experienced by a particular security or index by providing a relationship between a dependent and independent variable, such as the price of a security and the passage of time, resulting in a trend line that can be used as a predictive model.

A linear regression exhibits less delay than that experienced with a moving average, as the line is fit to the data points instead of based on the averages within the data. This allows the line to change more quickly and dramatically than a line based on numerical averaging of the available data points.

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