DEFINITION of 'Expected Family Contribution - EFC '

The amount of money that a student's family is expected to contribute to college costs for one year. Financial need is calculated as the difference between the cost of attending school and the expected family contribution. The EFC considers family income, assets, size of current household and the number of family members currently enrolled in college.

BREAKING DOWN 'Expected Family Contribution - EFC '

Generally, the lower the EFC, the higher the financial need, and therefore, the greater the eligibility for federally-sponsored financial aid programs such as Pell Grants, Perkins and Stafford Loans, and Federal Work-Study Programs. Families must submit a free application for federal student aid (FAFSA); following this application, the family will receive a student aid report (SAR) that includes the official EFC value.


This information is also sent to any schools that the student listed on the FAFSA, whereupon the school's financial aid office will prepare a financial aid package and financial award letter, informing the student and family of the amount of any expected financial aid in terms of grants and loans.

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