DEFINITION of 'Federal Reserve Communications System For The Eighties - FRCS-80'

A communication network established in 1981 in an effort to update the Federal Reserve's old system. This system connects the Federal Reserve Bank offices, Board of Governors, the Treasury and depository institutions. It is used to initiate transfers of U.S. securities and electronic funds transfers within institutions of the Federal Reserve.



BREAKING DOWN 'Federal Reserve Communications System For The Eighties - FRCS-80'

Planning for FRCS-80 began in late 1975. The system was initiated to take advantage of more efficient communications and technology that was available in the 1980s. The Federal Reserve also wanted to implement a better communication system that would handle payment systems throughout all depository institutions. The goal of the Federal Reserve with this network was to improve reliability of the Federal Reserve's communications operations, reduce costs and increase security of data.

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