DEFINITION of 'Finite Reinsurance'

A type of reinsurance that transfers over only a finite or limited amount of risk. Risk is reduced through accounting or financial methods, along with the actual transfer of economic risk. By transferring less risk to the reinsurer, the insurer receives coverage on its potential claims at a lower cost than traditional reinsurance.

BREAKING DOWN 'Finite Reinsurance'

For example, an insurer will set aside an amount to cover a percentage of the payouts that would be required if the particular risk is realized. Only when the amount does not cover the payouts will the reinsurer cover the risk. This limits the potential risk that the reinsurer faces and leads to lower costs for the insurer. The amount set aside is usually invested in government bonds and provides income that is put against potential claims. Due to the highly complex structure of these risk instruments, there can be abuses where no risk is transferred and the insurer's income is improved.

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