What is a 'Foreign Branch Bank'

A foreign branch bank is a type of foreign bank that is obligated to follow the regulations of both the home and host countries. Because the foreign branch banks' loan limits are based on the parent bank's capital, foreign banks can provide more loans than subsidiary banks.

BREAKING DOWN 'Foreign Branch Bank'

Banks often open a foreign branch in order to provide more services to their multinational corporation customers. However, operating a foreign branch bank may be considerably complicated because of the dual banking regulations that the foreign branch needs to follow.

For example, suppose the Bank of America opens a foreign branch bank in Canada. The branch would be legally obligated to follow both Canadian and American banking regulations.

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