DEFINITION of 'Hammering'

The rapid and concentrated sale of a stock thought to be overvalued by the market. It performed by investors and speculators who beleive that prices are inflated and that a period of liquidation is imminent.

BREAKING DOWN 'Hammering'

Hammering the market is achieved through large sale orders or many small sell orders. In some cases, investors may even collaborate on orders to attempt to push the share's price even lower.

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