DEFINITION of 'Industrial Development Revenue Bonds - IDRBs'

Municipal debt securities issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and intended to build or acquire factories or other heavy equipment and tools.

BREAKING DOWN 'Industrial Development Revenue Bonds - IDRBs'

Industrial Development Revenue Bonds are issued by a government to assist a private company that might otherwise be unable to obtain financing for its industrial venture or unwilling to undertake the project on its own. The government's goal in providing the debt securities is to improve the economic and employment conditions of its region.

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