DEFINITION of 'Incremental Dividend'

A series of regular increases to a corporation's dividend. Many large corporations choose to incorporate an incremental dividend policy because it illustrates the company's ability to continually increase the value to shareholders and is often a useful method used to maintain the interest of many income investors for the long run.

BREAKING DOWN 'Incremental Dividend'

For example, in 2004 the board of directors of Dominion Resources implemented a incremental dividend policy as a method of enhancing shareholder return.

It is important to note that any firm that fails to increase a dividend after it has a record of consecutive increases can experience a sharp sell-off because investors become apprehensive of when the dividend will be able to move up again.

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