What is an 'Independent Contractor'

An independent contractor is contracted to perform work or provide services to another entity as a non-employee. As a result, independent contractors must pay their own Social Security and Medicare taxes. The payer must correctly classify each payee as either an independent contractor or an employee. Another term for an independent contractor is freelancer

BREAKING DOWN 'Independent Contractor'

Doctors, dentists, veterinarians, lawyers, and many other professionals who provide independent services are classified as independent contractors by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). However, the category also includes contractors, subcontractors, freelance writers, auctioneers, actors, musicians, and many others who provide independent services to the general public.

Employee Versus Independent Contractor

Workers can have a classification of either an employee or an independent contractor. When a worker an independent contractor, the payer, or employer, can control only the quality or result of the job and not the method through which the work is done. When the worker is an employee, the payer can mandate the output occur in a particular place, time, or pace. A business owner has more control over the completion of the job.

In return for this control over work specifics, the owner commits to provide the employee with several benefits. Employee benefits include matching Social Security and Medicare contributions, providing the tools required to complete the project, or giving the worker access to a workplace. 

In contrast, independent contractors must provide benefits for themselves. They must cover both the employee and employer portions of Social Security and Medicare payments, among other expenses. The independent contractor must still meet the payer's quality standard and timeframe while producing the product.  Independent contractors often work for employers who are, physically, far removed from their location. As such, they must be ready to compete on the global market for work. Being an independent contractor has downsides, as they have no access to unemployment or worker's compensation payments. 

Filing Independent Contractor Taxes

In the United States, independent contractors are considered sole proprietors or single member limited liability companies (LLCs). They must report all their income and expenses on Schedule C of Form 1040 or Schedule E if they have profits or losses from rental properties. Further, they must submit self-employment taxes to the IRS, usually on a quarterly basis using form 1040-ES. As of 2018, independent contractors pay 12.4% in Social Security contributions and 2.9% in Medicare payments on the first $128,400 of their earnings.

However, as sole proprietors, independent contractors do not necessarily pay taxes on their gross earnings. Applicable business expenses may reduce the overall tax obligation. The difference between gross-earnings and business expenses is the net income, the amount on which taxes are due. Some independent contractors may also have to pay state sales taxes, depending on the product they are producing. 

Independent contractors must follow earnings including every payment received from clients. Some clients might issue 1099-Misc forms to their contractors if the amount paid warrants that expense. If an independent contractor earns more than $599 from a single payer, that payer is required to issue the contractor a 1099 form detailing their earnings for the year.

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