DEFINITION of 'Institutional Buyout - IBO'

When an institutional investor, such as a private equity firm or a venture capitalist firm, acquires a controlling interest in a separate company. Institutional buyouts are the opposite of management buyouts (MBO), in which a business's current management acquires a large part of the company. Typically, the investor in an IBO will look to dispose of its stake in the company within a certain time frame.

BREAKING DOWN 'Institutional Buyout - IBO'

An institutional buyout can also involve instances where a private equity firm acquires a company and keeps the current management or hires new managers and gives them stakes in the business. In general, the private equity firm involved in the IBO will take charge in structuring and exiting the deal as well as hiring managers.

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  3. Friendly Takeover

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  4. Buy, Strip And Flip

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    The purchase of a company's shares in which the acquiring party ...
  6. Private Purchase

    A situation in which an investor (either individual or institutional) ...
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